Upcoming Course Descriptions

Fall 2022

WS 2033. Womanist Spiritual Activism: Social Justice Theories for Wellness and Transformation. Introduction to interrelated roles of spiritual practice, imagination, and creativity in personal well-being and struggles for social justice. Multicultural, indigenous, and womanist approaches to wellness and social change. Satisfies three hours Core Component Area Option (90) or (91). Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

WS 3023. U.S. Women of Colors. Multidisciplinary, relational explorations of the histories, theories, cultures, and lives of U.S. women from a wide variety of ethnic/cultural backgrounds. Themes of agency, survival, resistance, and transformation. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Satisfies three hours Core Component Area Option (90). Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

WS 4493. Feminist Theory. Explores the diversity of feminist theories and their applications to the social, political, and intellectual contexts of women's lives. Includes consideration of historical context for the development of the theoretical perspectives and critiques their analytical strengths and weaknesses. Attention also given to particular theorists. Prerequisite: WS 2013. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

WS 5023. Foundations for Scholarly Inquiry. What is women’s and gender studies (WGS)? Is WGS related to the subject being studied, the way it is studied, who is studying it, where research is published, or some combination? Who decides what kinds of teaching, research, and politics fall within our outside of WGS? Through the semester we will explore these questions to elicit the complexity and dynamic nature of the field and to help you develop your own answers to them. In this class we will focus most of our attention on the history of WGS and its institutionalization in colleges and universities; explore significant trends, concerns, and debates in the field; investigate the strengths and limitations of WGS through readings, discussions, and our own experiences; and imagine what the future of WGS might hold. In addition, we’ll consider what it means to be in higher education—as students and educators in two ways: We will pay close attention to academic writing and discuss conventions of academic writing; and we will read and discuss articles, essays, and blog posts about higher education.

WS 5363.01. Womanist/Feminist Epistemologies. Through Indigenous, womanist, and feminist engagements with Cartesian-based, modernist worldviews, this course explores dominating and subjugated knowledge systems and ontologies. We explore questions like the following: What's the relationship between knowledge, perception, belief, action, and social change? How are thought, emotion, language, and physical reality interrelated? How might social, geographical, historical, and bodily location affect knowledge production, consumption, and transformation? What "counts" as knowledge, as fact/fiction, as truth/story? What are the justifications for these different designations, and when are such distinctions useful? What kinds of knowledge are transformative and for whom? Whose interests are/should be/could be served by diversifying what "counts" as knowledge and truth? What's the relationship between conventional western thought, academic disciplines, and contemporary social structures? Areas we investigate include: interconnections among "theory in the flesh," "standpoint epistemology," and "postpositivist realism;" posthumanist epistemologies; epistemologies of ignorance; transformational (decolonial) epistemologies; and epistemologies of whiteness. Instructor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating.

WS 5383.50. Women at Work: Race, Migrations, and Labors. We will embark on an interdisciplinary and multimedia journey through the migration and labor experiences of women of color from the 19th century until now. While traveling through various time periods we will also explore how women’s labor and migration experiences are integral to the politics of race, class, gender, and citizenship. By the end of the course, you should have a firmer understanding about the connections between various groups of women’s labor and migration histories and experiences and how women’s working lives are intricately tied to economic and political processes. Instructor: Dr. Danielle Phillips-Cunningham.

WS 5463. U.S. Women of Colors. Histories, theories, cultures, consciousness, and lives of U.S. women of colors from a variety of perspectives; issues related to conflict, agency, survival, resistance, intervention, and transformation. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

WS 6103.01. New Directions in Feminist/Womanist Theories. Through Indigenous, womanist, and feminist engagements with Cartesian-based, modernist worldviews, this course explores dominating and subjugated knowledge systems and ontologies. We explore questions like the following: What's the relationship between knowledge, perception, belief, action, and social change? How are thought, emotion, language, and physical reality interrelated? How might social, geographical, historical, and bodily location affect knowledge production, consumption, and transformation? What “counts” as knowledge, as fact/fiction, as truth/story? What are the justifications for these different designations, and when are such distinctions useful? What kinds of knowledge are transformative and for whom? Whose interests are/should be/could be served by diversifying what “counts” as knowledge and truth? What’s the relationship between conventional western thought, academic disciplines, and contemporary social structures? Areas we investigate include: interconnections among “theory in the flesh,” “standpoint epistemology,” and “postpositivist realism;” posthumanist epistemologies; epistemologies of ignorance; transformational (decolonial) epistemologies; and epistemologies of whiteness. We will also explore issues related to developing scholarly arguments, presentations, and publications. (WS 6103 is a core course in the MWGS doctoral curriculum. It may be repeated for credit when topic varies.) Instructor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating.

Page last updated 11:34 AM, August 29, 2022