Upcoming Course Descriptions

Summer 2022

WS 2033.50: Womanist Spiritual Activism

Professor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating (akeating@twu.edu)
Delivery mode: Fully online, asynchronous

Core: Meets Multicultural Women’s & Gender Studies OR Wellness 

Description: Womanist Spiritual Activism explores the interrelated issues of personal health, spirituality, political activism, and social transformation. It focuses on multicultural, Indigenous, and womanist approaches to wellness and social change. It investigates the interconnected roles of individual and collective wellness in struggles for social justice. This course satisfies the 3-credit hour requirement in Multicultural Women’s Studies or Wellness. Please note: In this course, “womanist” is not synonymous with “women” or even with “gender.” Rather, “womanist” is a very inclusive term; it refers to a philosophical system first articulated by Alice Walker, who associates its origins with Black Southern women’s worldviews. As Layli Maparyan explains in The Womanist Idea, “Womanism is a liberatory philosophy and praxis available to everyone of any gender or culture The womanist worldview and its associated social movement is rooted in the lived experience of survival, community building, intimacy with the natural environment, health, healing, and personal growth among everyday people from all walks of life and articulated primarily but not exclusively by women of color from around the world, and now a gift to all humanity.”

WS 5853.50: Spiritual Activism: Social Justice Theories for Holistic Transformation

Professor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating (akeating@twu.edu)
Delivery mode: Fully online, with meetings 7 to 9 pm on the following Wednesdays: June 15, 29, July 13, 27

Description: This seminar adopts an Anzaldúan, experiential approach to explore various politics of spirit, focusing especially on mindfulness, healing practices, pedagogy, communication, and other relational theories-praxis designed to facilitate individual and collective transformation in the service of progressive social justice. Issues explored include: technologies for transformation; relational epistemologies, ontologies, and ethics; self-care, self-change, and collective transformation; the relationship between (and definitions of) spirituality, healing, and decoloniality; the role(s) imagination, creativity, theory, spirit(s), spiritual technologies, and/or the arts can play in radical personal-collective change; embodied knowledges, spiritualities, and transformation; and translating womanist spiritual activism into a variety of contexts.

WS 2033.50: Womanist Spiritual Activism

Professor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating (akeating@twu.edu)
Delivery mode: Fully online, asynchronous

Core: Meets Multicultural Women’s & Gender Studies OR Wellness 

Description: Womanist Spiritual Activism explores the interrelated issues of personal health, spirituality, political activism, and social transformation. It focuses on multicultural, Indigenous, and womanist approaches to wellness and social change. It investigates the interconnected roles of individual and collective wellness in struggles for social justice. This course satisfies the 3-credit hour requirement in Multicultural Women’s Studies or Wellness. Please note: In this course, “womanist” is not synonymous with “women” or even with “gender.” Rather, “womanist” is a very inclusive term; it refers to a philosophical system first articulated by Alice Walker, who associates its origins with Black Southern women’s worldviews. As Layli Maparyan explains in The Womanist Idea, “Womanism is a liberatory philosophy and praxis available to everyone of any gender or culture The womanist worldview and its associated social movement is rooted in the lived experience of survival, community building, intimacy with the natural environment, health, healing, and personal growth among everyday people from all walks of life and articulated primarily but not exclusively by women of color from around the world, and now a gift to all humanity.”

WS 5853.50: Spiritual Activism: Social Justice Theories for Holistic Transformation

Professor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating (akeating@twu.edu)
Delivery mode: Fully online, with meetings 7 to 9 pm on the following Wednesdays: June 15, 29, July 13, 27

Description: This seminar adopts an Anzaldúan, experiential approach to explore various politics of spirit, focusing especially on mindfulness, healing practices, pedagogy, communication, and other relational theories-praxis designed to facilitate individual and collective transformation in the service of progressive social justice. Issues explored include: technologies for transformation; relational epistemologies, ontologies, and ethics; self-care, self-change, and collective transformation; the relationship between (and definitions of) spirituality, healing, and decoloniality; the role(s) imagination, creativity, theory, spirit(s), spiritual technologies, and/or the arts can play in radical personal-collective change; embodied knowledges, spiritualities, and transformation; and translating womanist spiritual activism into a variety of contexts.

Page last updated 10:18 AM, March 18, 2022