Haley Taylor Schlitz (BS '19)

A portrait of Haley Taylor Schlitz smiling outdoors on TWU's Denton campus.

Haley Taylor Schlitz graduated high school at the age of 13. She was accepted into 17 universities but had trouble finding exactly what she was looking for in a school... until she toured TWU. Now, at 16 years old, Taylor Schlitz is graduating with an undergraduate degree in interdisciplinary studies before law school.

In fifth grade, Taylor Schlitz’s parents noticed her losing interest in school. They asked for her to be tested as gifted, but were repeatedly told no. This led to their decision to homeschool.

After paying to have their daughter privately tested, Taylor Schlitz was finally classified as a gifted student. Homeschooling allowed her to move faster than a traditional school setting and offered more of a challenge. “It gave me the freedom to learn at my own speed,” says Taylor Schlitz. “Homeschool forced me to learn how to work from a syllabus, move forward and meet deadlines.”

It gave me the freedom to learn at my own speed. Homeschool forced me to learn how to work from a syllabus, move forward and meet deadlines.

For Taylor Schlitz, the biggest advantage of this system was time.

“I have the advantage of more time to actually do things I want to pursue. I don’t have to wait until 22 to go to law school. I will start law school at 16 and finish by 19. Time is a great thing to have more of.”

Taylor Schlitz says she chose TWU after realizing she “wanted an academic environment that would embrace me as a girl and help me reach my full potential.” While at TWU, Taylor Schlitz found a community of supportive classmates and professors.

“Even when they found out I was young, they didn’t leave me out of discussions. They really embraced me and supported me,” she says.

Taylor Schlitz also represents the College of Professional Education in student senate, is a Minerva Scholar and a member of the Center for Student Leadership and Association of Texas Professional Educators.

I have the advantage of more time to actually do things I want to pursue. I don’t have to wait until 22 to go to law school. I will start law school at 16 and finish by 19. Time is a great thing to have more of.

Struggling to be acknowledged as a gifted student inspired Taylor Schlitz to attend law school after graduation. She hopes to act as an advocate for greater inclusion in gifted and talented programs.

“My experience going through that left a lasting impression that many girls and students of color are left out of our nation’s gifted and talented programs,” Taylor Schlitz says. “Society will lose out on the potential scientist who cures a major disease, the entrepreneur who starts the next Amazon and so much more. All because of their gender and/or skin color.”

Society will lose out on the potential scientist who cures a major disease, the entrepreneur who starts the next Amazon and so much more. All because of their gender and/or skin color.

Media Contact

Matt Flores
Assistant Vice President, University Communications
940-898-3456
mattflores@twu.edu

Page last updated 10:58 AM, October 1, 2019