Kyra Solis (BS '19)

Kyra Solis smiling and posing in front of The White House in Washington, D.C.

Just before she transferred to Texas Woman’s University, Kyra Solis’ career plan seemed set: First, a nursing school education and then a steady position with a hospital or doctor’s group. But a dose of reality hit her shortly after her transfer, when she learned that getting into nursing school wasn’t as easy as she thought. Her grades were good enough, but the competition was fierce. 

A frank discussion with an academic adviser got her thinking about another academic opportunity, and in a similar direction: Health Studies.

“I realized I was more comfortable seeing the big picture – I don’t need to be the person addressing symptoms of people with illnesses; I want to be involved with changing the whole health system itself,” Solis said.

That she already possessed some leadership attributes and a passion for community health helped her solidify her pursuit of a health studies degree. Solis is president of TWU’s chapter of IGNITE, an organization dedicated to making young women more politically engaged; and she currently interns with the United Way of Denton County.

I’ve always loved health – and even though I won’t be a nurse, there will always be a need to help people get better.

That extracurricular background, coupled with a strong academic record, made her an attractive candidate for a position in leadership.

She was introduced to Nancy Bocskor, a board member of the Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN) – and TWU’s director of the Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy – who helped secure her a spot this fall on a one-of-a-kind intensive leadership conference for aspiring policy-makers in the health arena.

Solis was one of about 40 women chosen to take part in the three-day conference in Washington, D.C., where participants interacted with representatives of major pharmaceutical companies, community health clinics, advocacy groups, major hospitals and congressional staff to gain a better understanding of health care policy in the United States.

I realized I was more comfortable seeing the big picture – I don’t need to be the person addressing symptoms of people with illnesses; I want to be involved with changing the whole health system itself.

“It was energizing to see other people just as passionate as me getting into their majors. I see these people as those individuals that I eventually will work with,” she said.

Before she graduates in May 2019, Solis will continue to soak up opportunities to interact with leaders in the health field, and continue to build on her leadership skills.

“I’ve always loved health – and even though I won’t be a nurse, there will always be a need to help people get better.”

It was energizing to see other people just as passionate as me getting into their majors. I see these people as those individuals that I eventually will work with.

Page last updated 2:20 PM, December 3, 2018