Upcoming Course Descriptions

Summer 2021

WS 2013: Gender and Social Change
Gender and Social Change is an exciting opportunity to ask critical questions about gender as it intersects with other identity categories, such as race, class, nationality, sexuality, and disability. This survey explores social, cultural, political, and economic issues historically and in the present through a range of topics that may include popular culture and media, labor and employment, violence against women, gender and the family, reproductive justice and other health issues, environmental issues, and activism against injustice. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to power and privilege, this class gives students the opportunity to practice critical thinking and to engage in a way that is relevant to their own fields of study and interests.

WS 2013.50 – 100% Online – Instructor: GTA: Christina Cavener – ccavener@twu.edu

WS 2033: Womanist Spiritual Activism: Social Justice Theories for Wellness & Holistic Transformation
Womanist spiritual activism offers an innovative approach to personal and social health, well-being, and transformation. It draws on Gloria Anzaldúa’s theory-praxis of spiritual activism, Layli Maparyan’s womanist idea, and Indigenous philosophies to posit a relational worldview in which self- and world change occur simultaneously. As such, womanist spiritual activism represents an inclusive approach to individual wellness and social change, one enacted by women, men, and nonbinary people of many racial/ethnic backgrounds. This course explores womanist spiritual activism as theory and practice, offering tools for stress-reduction and greater well-being at both individual and collective levels.

WS 2033.50 – 100% Online – Instructor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating – akeating@twu.edu

WS 3023: U.S. Women of Colors 
The primary aim of this course is to examine the intersectional theorizing and activism that Native American, African American, Asian American, and Latinx women have engaged in to resist white supremacy, misogyny, xenophobia, and homophobia in the United States. Some sections of this course will use different types of subject material to explore women of color resistance through books, poetry, music, films, and protest literature from the nineteenth century until the present. 

WS 3023.50 – 100% Online – GTA: Esther Ajayi-Lowo – eajayilowo@twu.edu

WS 5843: Feminist Womanist Theories 

Description forthcoming…

WS 5843.50 – 100% Online – Instructor: Dr. Danielle Phillips-Cunningham – dphillips3@twu.edu

Fall 2021

WS 2013: Gender and Social Change
Gender and Social Change is an exciting opportunity to ask critical questions about gender as it intersects with other identity categories, such as race, class, nationality, sexuality, and disability. This survey explores social, cultural, political, and economic issues historically and in the present through a range of topics that may include popular culture and media, labor and employment, violence against women, gender and the family, reproductive justice and other health issues, environmental issues, and activism against injustice. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to power and privilege, this class gives students the opportunity to practice critical thinking and to engage in a way that is relevant to their own fields of study and interests.

WS 2013.02 – Tuesdays/Thursdays 9:30-10:50 a.m. – Instructor: TBA
WS 2013.03 – Tuesdays/Thursdays 11:00-12:20 p.m. – Instructor: TBA
WS 2013.05 – Tuesdays/Thursdays 1:00-2:20 p.m. – Instructor: TBA
WS 2013.07 – Mondays/Wednesdays 11:00-12:20 p.m. – Instructor: TBA
WS 2013.09 – Mondays/Wednesdays 1:00-2:20 p.m. – Instructor: TBA
WS 2013.51 – 100% Online – Instructor: Dr. Agatha Beins – abeins@twu.edu
WS 2013.52 – 100 % Online – Instructor: Dr. Agatha Beins – abeins@twu.edu
WS 2013.53 – 100 % Online – Instructor: Dr. Agatha Beins – abeins@twu.edu

WS 2033: Womanist Spiritual Activism: Social Justice Theories for Wellness & Holistic Transformation
Womanist spiritual activism offers an innovative approach to personal and social health, well-being, and transformation. It draws on Gloria Anzaldúa’s theory-praxis of spiritual activism, Layli Maparyan’s womanist idea, and Indigenous philosophies to posit a relational worldview in which self- and world change occur simultaneously. As such, womanist spiritual activism represents an inclusive approach to individual wellness and social change, one enacted by women, men, and nonbinary people of many racial/ethnic backgrounds. This course explores womanist spiritual activism as theory and practice, offering tools for stress-reduction and greater well-being at both individual and collective levels

WS 2033.01 – Mondays/Wednesdays 11:00-12:20 p.m. – Instructor: TBA 
WS 2033.50 – 100% Online – Instructor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating – akeating@twu.edu 
WS 2033.51 – 100% Online – Instructor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating – akeating@twu.edu

WS 3023: U.S. Women of Colors 
The primary aim of this course is to examine the intersectional theorizing and activism that Native American, African American, Asian American, and Latinx women have engaged in to resist white supremacy, misogyny, xenophobia, and homophobia in the United States. Some sections of this course will use different types of subject material to explore women of color resistance through books, poetry, music, films, and protest literature from the nineteenth century until the present. 

WS 3023.01 – Tuesdays/Thursdays 1:00-2:20 p.m. – Instructor: TBA
WS 3023.50 – 100% Online – Instructor: TBA

WS 3193: Women and Western Religions 
What are women’s roles and contributions to Western religious traditions (Islam, Judaism, Christianity, and more)? What are the connections between religion and gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, and culture? In this course, students will analyze religion and engage with feminist/womanist/queer critiques that both challenge and transform Western religious traditions. Students will reflect on how current events relate to the course; how religion and its practices inform diverse experiences of women; and how authority and power shape religious rituals, practices, and traditions. This course demonstrates the interconnectedness between religion and other social categories, exploring the multiplicity of people’s intersectional identities.

WS 3193.01 – Tuesdays/Thursdays 2:30-3:50 p.m. – Instructor: TBA

WS 4023.50: Sexualities & Identities

Description forthcoming…

WS 4023.50 – 100% Online w/synchronous sessions - Mondays 2:30-3:50 p.m.- Instructor: TBA

WS 4493: Feminist Theory 
Feminist theories have been instrumental to monumental movements throughout history such as the women’s suffrage, reproductive rights, civil rights, and Black Lives Matter movements. These movements have resulted in significant changes such as women gaining the right to vote; equal pay and anti-sexual harassment laws; and the recent large-scale protests against racial profiling and police brutality. This course is an introduction to the diverse strands of feminist thought in the United States from the nineteenth century through the twenty-first century and its relationship to pivotal social movements. We will draw from books, articles, and digital media to examine the genealogies and contemporary manifestations of the following feminist theories: intersectionality, queer theory, Marxist feminism, and postcolonial feminism. By the end of the semester, you should have a deeper understanding of feminist theory and its impact on society historically and today.

WS 4493.50 – 100% Online – Instructor: Dr. Danielle Phillips-Cunningham – dphillips3@twu.edu

WS 4903/5043: ST: Art, Activism and Social Justice
How have artists and activists pushed the boundaries of what counts as art and who counts as an artist? How has art been used to challenge our ideas about society and politics and to offer new visions of radically transformative futures? How have activists used art in social movements? In Art, Activism, and Social Justice we’ll explore these questions through different creative works—songs, film and video, visual art, performance, and multimedia art—by artists across the world. In addition to a wide range of art, artists, and case studies, we’ll read about creativity and social justice from Latinx, Black, queer, and feminist perspectives.

WS 4903.50/5043.01 – Bracketed - Mondays 6:00-8:50 p.m. – Instructor: Dr. Agatha Beins – abeins@twu.edu

WS 5293 Gloria Anzaldúa Seminar
This seminar investigates the work of Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa, focusing especially on her groundbreaking theoretical, philosophical, and aesthetic contributions and her innovative social-justice work. Some of the Anzaldúan theories we explore include the following: conocimiento, el mundo zurdo, nepantla, nepantleras, new tribalism, spiritual activism, mestiza consciousness, and the Coyolxauhqui process. We will also examine Anzaldúa’s impact on ethnic studies, feminist theory, literary theory, composition theory, queer theory, education studies, and other academic fields. Students will explore applications of Anzaldúan theory and apply Anzaldúan theory to a project of their own.

WS/ENG 5293/5903.50 – F2F alternating Tuesdays, 2:30 to 5:20 p.m. Beginning 8/24 –Instructor: Dr. AnaLouise Keating – akeating@twu.edu 

WS 5463: U.S. Women of Colors 
Description forthcoming…

WS 5463.01 – 100 % Online w/synchronous sessions - Tuesdays 6:00-8:50 p.m. – Instructor: TBA

WS 6303 Transdisciplinary Research Methods

Description forthcoming…

WS 6303.01 – Online, w/F2F meetings Wednesdays 2:30-5:50p on 9/8, 10/16, 11/3, 12/1 – Instructor: Instructor: Dr. Danielle Phillips-Cunningham – dphillips3@twu.edu

Page last updated 4:42 PM, May 24, 2021