Pushkala Raman, PhD

Dr. Raman smiling and laughing while giving a lecture.

College of Business professor Pushkala Raman, PhD, began using experiential learning projects long before it became part of Texas Woman’s University’s focus. In fact, Raman had not even heard the term “experiential learning” when she began looking for real-world experiences for her students.

“As far back as 2006, I looked for real projects,” Raman said. “I was looking for a way to make marketing research more meaningful to my students and to let them know that what they do in class really matters.”

Raman grew up in Southern India with parents who always encouraged her to study hard and pursue her dreams. After earning her undergraduate degree in physics from Madras University and MBA from the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, Raman discovered her love of teaching as a PhD student and teaching assistant at Texas A&M.

“I enjoy the challenge of making marketing research fun for students who typically come into the class thinking it is going to be boring and just a bunch of statistics,” Raman said.

I was looking for a way to make marketing research more meaningful to my students and to let them know that what they do in class really matters.

Experiential learning projects for Raman’s marketing research and small business courses have included:

  • Market research for the design of TWU’s class ring
  • Market demand estimate for the Frisco Chamber of Commerce
  • Marketing plan for Denton events for the Denton Convention and Visitors Bureau
  • Brand image study for TWU’s Department of Marketing and Communication
  • Education Plan for Denton County Works
  • Marketing research and new market exploration for Tony Lama Boots
  • Marketing plan and new product planning for Bracance Health Services in Plano
  • Marketing research for social media plan with ISW Men’s Wearhouse

I want my students to believe in themselves. I try to ensure that my classes are constructed such that there are multiple ways in which they can succeed.

Outside of the classroom, Raman conducts research that students can participate in if their interests align. Most recently, Raman completed a study sponsored by TWU’s Center for Women in Business (CWB) on what women want in their ideal workplaces.

“Work flexibility and benefits were the most important,” Raman said. “Work flexibility was expressed primarily in terms of trusting women to get their jobs done and not be micro-managed.”

Raman continues to study women in the workplace and said she “would like to create and publish an annual survey of best workplaces for women” with the CWB.

Currently, Raman is working on a project on online teaching. “I am looking at the effects of verbal and written student feedback on student engagement and connectedness in an online environment,” she said.

However, Raman’s main goal lies in the classroom: “I want my students to believe in themselves.”

I enjoy the challenge of making marketing research fun for students who typically come into the class thinking it is going to be boring and just a bunch of statistics.

Media Contact

Christy Savage
Staff Reporter
940-898-3254
csavage3@twu.edu

Page last updated 3:42 PM, October 18, 2019