Fall 2020 Courses

HIST 4103

Renaissance & Reformations

Mondays and Wednesdays 1-2:20 p.m.

Explore the social and cultural history of Early Modern Europe (ca. 1300-1600) in this upper division undergraduate course.  We’ll study the great artistic accomplishments of the Italian Renaissance, follow Machiavelli’s tortured political career, and study the Reformations through the eyes of Luther, Calvin, and Henry VIII.

Michaelangelo's Sistine Chapel ceiling painting depicting God and Adam touching hands

Topics to be covered include:

  • Women in Renaissance and Reformation Societies
  • Popular Piety, Popular Literatures, & Popular Culture
  • The Politics of the Renaissance State: Warfare & Diplomacy
  • Disease and Urban Life in Renaissance Europe
  • Reformation Pieties and Politics
  • Orthodoxy, Heresy, Witchcraft, & Reform 
  • The Role of Ritual in Renaissance and Reformation Society

For more information contact Dr. Jacob Blosser: jblosser@twu.edu 

HIST 4813

Public History

Watch the HIST 4813 Public History course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Katherine Landdeck: klanddeck@twu.edu

HIST 4903.02

Black and white photo of immigrants existing a boat onto Ellis Island

Your Family’s Story

Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30-11 a.m.

This course prepares students for the rigors of original research. You will spend the semester researching a person or story from your family that will use both primary and secondary documents.  This research intensive course introduces you to the diverse records used by historians including federal and state census records, newspaper archives, oral history interviews, church records and naturalization records used b genealogists and professional historians.  In this course you will discover what is unique about family’s story and how it fits or challenges larger patterns and narratives. The goal of this research is to help you hone your skills as a researcher, to grapple with the challenges of doing primary historical research, to see how your family story makes up and fits the mosaic of history, and finally, to make history interesting! This course will help you develop skills as a researcher that will benefit you in future classes and in your professional development.   

I look forward to learning with you your family’s contributions to American history. 

For more information please contact Dr. Sara Fanning: sfanning@twu.edu

HIST 5103

Renaissance & Reformations

Mondays 6-9 p.m.

Explore the social and cultural history of Early Modern Europe (ca. 1300-1600) in this graduate seminar.  Through an intensive look at recent scholarship, we will explore key themes, people, and events in the Italian Renaissance and the Reformations of the 16th century.

German woodcut depicting the reformation in black and white

Topics to be covered include:

  • Women in Renaissance and Reformation Societies
  • Popular Piety, Popular Literatures, & Popular Culture
  • Reformation Orthodoxies, Heresies, & Confessional Identities
  • The Politics of the Renaissance State: Warfare & Diplomacy
  • The Role of Ritual in Renaissance and Reformation Society

For more information contact Dr. Jacob Blosser: jblosser@twu.edu 

HIST 5813

Public History Methodology

Watch the HIST 5813 Public History course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Katherine Landdeck: klanddeck@twu.edu

POLS 2013

U.S. National Government

Watch the POLS 2013 U.S. National Government course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Wouter van Erve: wvanerve@twu.edu 

POLS 2023.90

Texas Government Honors

Watch the POLS 2023.90 Texas Government Honors course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Parker Hevron: phevron@twu.edu

POLS 3153.01

Law, Politics, and Public Policy

Watch the POLS 3153.01 Law, Politics, and Public Policy course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Parker Hevron: phevron@twu.edu

POLS 3173

Intro to Comparative Politics

Watch the POLS 3173 Intro to Comparative Politics course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Vivienne Born: VBorn@twu.edu 

POLS 3723.01

Modern Political Thought

Tuesdays and Thursdays 11 a.m.-12:20 p.m.

H.G. Wells observed that “human history is in essence a history of ideas.” Come explore the dynamics of Renaissance Europe, the English Civil War, the French Revolution, the “age” of ideologies, and the potential clash of civilizations as background to the grand ideas and theories of Machiavelli, Al Farabi, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Mary Wollstonecraft, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Karl Marx, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, and others who have shaped the modern and postmodern political worlds.

How do liberals, socialists, Marxists, communists, fascists, anarchists, existentialists, white nationalists, followers of ISIL, Al Qaeda, the Taliban, and others differ on questions regarding gender, property rights, who should rule and why, and basic principles of good government, among other issues?  

For more information contact Dr. Timothy Hoye: thoye@twu.edu 

POLS 4073

Constitutional Law: Government Structure

Watch the POLS 4073 Constitutional Law course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Wouter van Erve: wvanerve@twu.edu 

POLS 4563

Global Law & Legal Systems

Watch the POLS 4563 Global Law & Legal Systems course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Wouter van Erve: wvanerve@twu.edu 

POLS 4813.50

Seminar in Public Policy

Watch the POLS 4813.50 Seminar in Public Policy course preview on YouTube

This undergraduate seminar is broadly concerned with political science and the American public policy process. We will explore the major theories of policy change and use those theories to help us understand eras of American public policymaking. The course will examine models of decision-making, explore the formation of public policies, and discover the drivers of policy change over time. In addition to exploring the policy making process, we will ask how institutions and policies can be designed to encourage more effective policy implementation. In short – we will explore how to go from theory to practice.

For more information contact Dr. Clare Brock: cbrock1@twu.edu

POLS 4833.01

Political Science: Scope and Methods

Cover of a politics textbook depicting a bust and women's march photo

Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30-10:50 a.m.

Did you know that the discipline of political science is over twenty-four hundred years old?  What have we learned?  What is the discipline’s scope and what are its methods today?  How has the discipline impacted today’s world?  Did you know that Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi, Joseph Biden, Mitch McConnell, Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Samuel Alito, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, John F. Kennedy, Alec Baldwin, and Peter Falk, just to name a few, were political science majors in college? Come and explore the world of international politics and its disciplined study from ancient Athens to presidents and prime ministers who “tweet”. Read and discuss a classic, Plato’s Republic, and a popular text on the range and depth of the discipline today.

For more information contact Dr. Timothy Hoye: thoye@twu.edu

POLS 4903

Dilemmas in Immigration

Watch the POLS 4903 Dilemmas in Immigration course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Vivienne Born: vborn@twu.edu 

POLS 4903

Global Political Economy

Watch the POLS 4903 Global Political Economy course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Vivienne Born: vborn@twu.edu 

POLS 5903

Fascism and the Radical Right

As the prominent scholar Richard Griffiths has noted, "Fascism" is one of the most misused, and over-used, words among the public all over the world. Although both historians and political scientists have tried to bring more clarity, their definitions and understandings are contradictory and conflicting. Although it would be misguided to suggest that this course will somehow settle these disputes, we will try to come to an understanding of what Fascism might be - and what it is not - through both an historical and conceptual examination. Starting with its precursors, we will then examine the history, thought, and practice of National Socialism, Italian Fascism, and other interwar European Fascist regimes to start to get a clearer picture of "Fascism". After that, we will turn to Fascism in the postwar era - or at least what some consider "neo-Fascism" and the contemporary radical right. Throughout the course, the approach will be historical, conceptual, and empirical.

For more information contact Dr. Jon Olsen: jolsen1@twu.edu

POLS 5093.01

Seminar in American Politics

Watch the POLS 5093.01 Seminar in American Politics course preview on YouTube

For more information contact Dr. Parker Hevron: phevron@twu.edu 

Page last updated 4:55 PM, April 27, 2020