Upcoming Course Descriptions

Spring 2021

ENG 2033.50/51 American Literary Masterpieces

Dr. Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous. 

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language Philosophy, Culture)***
An introduction to great works of American literature from the Civil War to the present. Mostly fiction. Some poetry. One play. The course will be as much an introduction to literature as it is an introduction to modern American literature. View the ENG 2033.50/51 flyer>>

ENG 2073.50 Mythology

Gray Scott, PhD (grayscott@twu.edu
Asynchronous: fully online. This class will be conducted 100% online.

The oldest visual representations of sirens painted them as birdlike and the oldest portrayals of their song showed them tempting men with their knowledge, not their bodies. Some of the oldest depictions of Gorgons appear in gorgoneia—protective symbols to ward off evil. Our perspectives on these and other creatures of mythology have changed over the centuries. This class will focus on those transformations, examining the ways in which translations, interpretations, and retellings of mythology represent creative and political acts that can differ significantly from each other. 

ENG 2073.50 Mythology

Stephen Souris, PhD (SSouris@twu.edu)
Asynchronous: fully online. This class will be conducted 100% online. There are no mandatory synchronous events.

We will steep ourselves in a global survey of world mythologies using DK’s visually stimulating The Mythology Book.  Supplementing that overview, we’ll read short works of literature where mythological archetypes (themes) can be discerned. David Burrows’ anthology, Myths and Motifs in Literature, will provide the literary selections. We’ll conclude by watching “The Matrix” and “Wonder Woman” (available on YouTube [$4 each to rent] and elsewhere). Download the 2073.50 course flyer for more details (pdf).

English 2153.02—Introduction to Literature

Dr. Vivian Casper (vcasper@twu.edu
Synchronously by teleconference, T/Th 9:30-10:50

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language Philosophy, Culture)***
This course will be a discussion course conducted by teleconferencing (we will all be on the telephone at the same time at set times of the week).  We will study well-known plays, poems, and short stories.  The latter two will be found in inexpensive paperback editions.  The former will be studied in individual paperback editions.

English/WS 2393.01—Introduction to Literature by Women

Dr. Vivian Casper (vcasper@twu.edu
Synchronously by teleconference, M/W 11:00-12:20

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language Philosophy, Culture OR Multicultural Women’s)***
This course will be a discussion course conducted by teleconferencing (we will all be on the telephone at the same time at set times of the week).  We will study approximately 8-9 modern and contemporary plays by women, each in a separate edition.

ENG-WS 2393.50: Intro to Literature by Women

Dr. Phyllis Bridges (pbridges@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language Philosophy, Culture OR Multicultural Women’s)***
Works of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry by American women authors. This course allows all of us an opportunity to engage with each other from a literary and women’s studies perspective.  We will study short works from the early days of the Republic to contemporary times; and we will consider the many voices that make up American literature.  Authors of multiple ethnicities and works in various genres will give us many options to expand our knowledge and understanding. Great Short Stories by American Women (Dover Thrift Edition), edited by Candace Ward, Great Poems by American Women (Dover Thrift Edition), edited by Susan Rattiner, Short Story Masterpieces by American Women Writers (Dover Thrift Edition), edited by Clarence Strowbridge.  The textbooks are available from many online vendors as well as in the TWU Bookstore.  The books are very reasonably priced.  Additional materials will be available on Canvas as well as on reserve in the TWU library.

ENG-WS 2393.90: Intro to Literature by Women (Honors)

Dr. Ashley Bender (abender@twu.edu)
Fully online with Tuesday synchronous sessions 1:00-2:20 

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language Philosophy, Culture OR Multicultural Women’s)***
This course will explore a range of genres (fiction, poetry, drama, nonfiction) by living BIPOC women. Dr. Bender is still selecting texts and welcomes suggestions. Email her if there is a text you’d like to see on the reading list! 

ENG 3023.01: British Literature from 1760 to the Present

Russell Greer, PhD (rgreer@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous.  

This course will survey selected significant works of British literature from 1760 to the Present (in the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern British periods) using The Broadview Anthology of British Literature.  Concise Edition.  Volume B.  Third Edition.  Throughout the course, we will also read Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen.

ENG 3033.01. Intro to the Study of World Literature

Michael Cerliano (mcerliano@twu.edu)
Fully online 

Study of ancient, classical, medieval, and modern literature, with a stress on the intercultural relationships reflected through the translation and transmission of texts. Satisfies Global Perspectives graduation requirement. Prerequisite: 9 hours of English. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

English 3053.01—Fiction

Dr. Vivian Casper (vcasper@twu.edu)
Synchronously by teleconference, T/Th 11:00-12:20

This course will be a discussion course conducted by teleconferencing (we will all be on the telephone at the same time at set times of the week). The short stories to be studied will be found in two inexpensive paperback editions: The Signet Classic Book of American Short Stories and Black American Short Stories: A Century of the Best.

ENG 3053.50 Fiction

Dr. Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous 

Through a study of modern American short stories, we will refine our understanding of fiction as a genre.  John Updike’s best-selling anthology, Best American Short Stories of the Century, will be supplemented by a multicultural collection titled Imagining America: Stories from the Promised Land. View the ENG 3053.50 flyer>> 

ENG 3113.01 Intro to English Studies

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)
Fully online, synchronous sessions Tuesdays 1:00-2:20, the rest synchronous

An introduction to English studies, with attention to literary, expository, and professional writing; research practices appropriate to the field with varied texts. Prerequisite: ENG 1023 with a grade of C or higher. Co-requisite: Must be taken before or concurrently with first 3000-level literature course. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 3123.01* Creative Writing

Gray Scott, PhD (grayscott@twu.edu)
Asynchronous: fully online.

***This is a seven-week course that runs 1/11-2/26.***
A tried and true way to attract the attention of agents and market your work to a population of avid readers—the sorts of people who leave reviews and whose word-of-mouth sells books—is to publish the occasional short story. Most novelists do so, with many admitting they love the form. Magazines still exist which publish such stories. We still have genre magazines like Ellery Queen (for crime and mystery fiction), Analog (for science-fiction), and Black Static (for horror). Literary magazines like McSweeney’s, One Story, Zoetrope, Granta, and Kenyon Review continue to publish literary and mainstream fiction. Agents watch all of these for exciting new voices. However, although most writers will tell you that short stories are in some ways harder to write than novels, it can be tough to find good advice for writing stories at this length in today’s marketplace. That marketplace is changing rapidly. Podcast fiction journals like Escape Pod and Drabblecast carry stunning audio fiction. Award-winning journals like Glittership, Fiyah, and Luna Station dedicate themselves to LGBTQ, Black, and women audiences respectively. Editors increasingly use Kickstarter to launch themed anthologies and writers compose short stories for Patreon supporters. In this class, you’ll learn about the modern short story market; read today’s trendsetters in several genres; and hone your abilities to craft short fiction of your own. Interested writers should know that this class won’t shame genres. Whether your thing is horror, romance, literary, sci-fi, or gritty crime, there are good people doing that thing well, and you can be one of them.

ENG 3153.01—Modern African American Drama

Dr. Vivian Casper (vcasper@twu.edu)
Synchronously by teleconference, MW 9:30-10:50

This course will be a discussion course conducted by teleconferencing (we will all be on the telephone at the same time at set times of the week). We will study well-known modern and contemporary plays written for the American theatre by African American men and women.

ENG 3153.01.50

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)
Fully online, synchronous sessions Wednesdays from 1:00-2:20; the rest asynchronous. 

Topic: African American Protest Literature

ENG 3203.01 Advanced Grammar and Composition 

Dr. Brian Fehler (bfehler@twu.edu)
Fully online and asynchronous with optional synchronous meetings.

A few years ago, Garnet Hertz and Jussi Parikka wrote an article about so-called “Zombie Media” in which they develop an idea of “media archaeology.” Their goal is to push back against planned obsolescence of technologies and to “excavate repressed and forgotten media and their discourses, to recognize zombie media—dead media revitalized, brought back to use, reworked.”

We will (perhaps surprisingly!) use this media/ted concept and rework for our own (grammatical!) purposes—a grammars archaeology! That is to say, we will look for and analyze “zombie grammars” for the ways in which those grammars were utilized, taught, and (inevitably?) eventually discarded. Examining “dead grammars” thusly will enable us to better recognize the constructedness of our conventions and to see how those constructions have been and still can be used for rhetorical purposes. We will begin our readings with the Declaration of Independence and Declaration of Sentiments and along the way see how and where traditions of diagramming sentences emerged—and learn to practice them ourselves!

ENG 3203.03 Advanced Grammar and Composition

Dr. Brian Fehler
Fully online and asynchronous with optional synchronous meetings.

***For 7-12 Teacher Certification Students***
A statement attributed to Kenya’s first president, Jomo Kenyatta, goes like this: “When the missionaries arrived, the Africans had the land and the missionaries had the Bible. They taught us to pray with our eyes closed. When we opened them, they had the land and we had the Bible." I came across this phrase for the first time in a letter to the British newspaper The Guardian (“A Colonial Disaster”). This statement (misattributed in the letter) tells a story that’s important historically and politically and also educationally. That is to say, teaching, maybe especially the teaching of grammars and writing—the subjects of this course—always involves the imposition of a frame. As grammars and writing are conventions, we must also ask: are they conventional? And if they are, in what ways—and to what effect(s)?

Our course will focus on the development of “powerful literacy” and the ways in which conventions of grammars and writing contribute to and restrict that development. What is powerful literacy and how do and why should we teach it? These are questions that will occupy us this semester as we unriddle the complexities and conventions of our grammars. We’ll be aided along the way by readings (many available online in Canvas) by Henry Giroux, bell hooks, Patrick Finn, Mike Rose, Mina Shaughnessy, Sherry Lee Linkin, Paulo Freire, and others.

ENG 3252.50/51: Technical Writing

Dr. Jackie Hoermann-Elliott (jhelliott@twu.edu): Mondays (section 50)
Dr. Rachel Daugherty (rdaugherty1@twu.edu): Tuesdays (section 51)
Fully online, Monday or Tuesday synchronous sessions from 1:00-2:20 pm

Do you want to learn more about the field of technical communication? Do you have an interest in being the intermediary source of content creation between people and organizations? Technical writing is a class designed to provide you with both theoretical and practical knowledge of technical communication practices. Special emphasis will be given to writing, editing, analyzing, collaborating, designing, and presenting in order to develop skills that transfer to the workplace. View the ENG 3252.50/51>>

ENG 3293.50. American Literature: Realism to the Present

Dr. Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous 

Great works of American literature from the Civil War to the present.  Mostly fiction (several short stories and a couple short novels).  Some highly accessible poetry. One famous play. View the ENG 3293.50 flyer>>

ENG 3363.01 Linguistics

Dr. Matt Brown (mbrown39@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous 

Introduction to the techniques and practice of recent linguistic theory, including the structural and generative approaches to English syntax and grammar. Prerequisite: ENG 1023. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 3433.01 Professional Writing

Margaret Williams (mwilliams@twu.edu)
Hybrid: M/W 9:30-10:50. Students will attend one assigned day/week, remainder online 

Strategies for individual and collaborative practice in selected workplace genres. Prerequisites: Nine hours of English or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours. This course will use Open Education Resources, a free or low-cost text.

ENG 4363.01 Digital Rhetoric

Dr. Dundee Lackey (dlackey@twu.edu)
Fully online: Synchronous sessions Wednesdays 6:00-8:50 PM. 

Analysis, theory, production, and pedagogy of digitally-mediated texts. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of English or permission of instructor. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 4443.01 Major Authors (Jane Austen)

Russell Greer, PhD (rgreer@twu.edu)
Fully online: Synchronous sessions Mondays 6-7 p.m.; the rest asynchronous  

In this course, students will read four Jane Austen novels in the Norton critical editions, criticism about those novels, and one biography.  Specifically, students will read Mansfield Park (1814), Emma (1815), Northanger Abbey (1818), and Persuasion (1818).   

ENG 4463.01 Lit Theory and Criticism

Russell Greer, PhD (rgreer@twu.edu)
Fully online: Synchronous sessions Tuesdays, 6-7:20 p.m.; the rest asynchronous

Survey of theory and practice of literary criticism. Prerequisite: 12 hours of English or permission of instructor. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 4483.50 Methods of Teaching English

A. Brewer
Hybrid with F2F meetings on alternating weeks starting 1/12, Tuesdays 6:00-8:50 PM

Effective methods of teaching English, including structuring small-group and whole-class activities and discussions, teaching composition, encouraging students' close reading of texts through rhetorical analysis and literary criticism, and producing technologically-enhanced classroom presentations. Prerequisites: Nine hours of English. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5083.01 Bibliography & Research Methods

Dr. Ashley Bender (abender@twu.edu)
Fully online, synchronous sessions Wednesdays 6:00-8:00 PM, the rest online

Methods of research, with a focus on techniques appropriate to the thesis or dissertation. May be repeated for up to twelve hours credit. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours. ***This semester, we will focus especially on digital tools for research, including tools to help us organize our research (e.g., Zotero), as well as tools that allow us to research digitally (e.g., electronic resources, digital archives, etc.). The course will focus, in part, on the history of the book; scholarly editing practices; general research methods, as well as methods in archival research and digital humanities. Students will produce work individually and collaboratively. This course is equal parts theory and praxis.***

ENG 5173.50 Ethnic, Multicultural, Cross-Cultural Literature

Dr. Gretchen Busl (gbusl@twu.edu)
Fully online, synchronous sessions Mondays 6:00-8:50 PM

Topic: African, Indigenous, and Latinx allohistories (alternative histories) and futurisms
This course aims to examine fictional texts which represent an alternate past or future in order to resist dominant narratives. We will consider questions like:

  • How does speculative fiction which presents an alternate past or future allow us to critique the present?
  • How does imagining "what if" prompt us to question "what next?"
  • How do we use possible worlds theory to understand what is else possible in the world, or unnatural narratology to interrogate what is "natural"?
  • How do Afro-, Indigenous, and/or Latinx futurisms work as part of larger movements of social action? 

ENG 5263.50 Studies in American Literature

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous

Topic: African American Protest Literature

ENG 5353.01 Rhetoric and Composition: Theory and Pedagogy of Electronic Texts

Dr. Dundee Lackey (dlackey@twu.edu)
Fully online with synchronous sessions Tuesdays from 6:00-8:50

Rhetorical theories and techniques of teaching with non-print texts, particular attention to writing and literature. Investigates interactions between text and image. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: ENG 5343. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5903.01 Digital Rhetoric

Dr. Dundee Lackey (dlackey@twu.edu)
Fully online with synchronous sessions Wednesdays from 6:00-8:50

ENG 6223.50: History of Rhetoric III

Dr. Brian Fehler
Fully online, asynchronous with optional synchronous meetings

We’ll think about this era as, over time, one in which rhetoric, we might say, came to the people, or the people came to rhetoric. It is an era in which became, increasingly, slowly, democratized and democratizing. It is an era in which rhetoric and oratory faded from the academy, despite the dazzling popularity or rhetors and orators. It was an era, in the United States, called by literary critic Lawrence Buell “a cult of oratory.” It was an era which saw rhetoricians fight for rights, and sometimes lose, fight against war, and often lose. It was an era in which rhetoric was rediscovered, in an academic sense. It was an era in which composition, as we know it, began in American universities. It was an era in which professions and professionalization emerged and along with them compartmentalization and disciplines, including the discipline of studying modern literature. Our guiding principle, our organizing theme, for the semester will be this: rhetoric of the people, by the people, for the people. But also, we’ll ask: how did we get “here,” what rhetorical traditions got us t/here…and where they’ll take us. As CCCC 2019, in Pittsburgh, three statements from rhetorical historians especially struck me. Those statements (paraphrased by me)…from Gwendolyn Pugh: “Difficult times call for rhetorical traditions.”… From Jay Dolmage, referencing our disciplinary “givens,”: “what if we’re right?”… And Victor Vitanza, referencing the same: “What if we’re wrong?” 

ENG 6283.50 Studies in Critical Theory

Dr. Matt Brown (mbrown39@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous

Topic: Metaphor

ENG 6323.50: Studies in Feminist Rhetoric

Johnathan Smilges, PhD (jsmilges@twu.edu)
Fully online.  Synchronous meetings on Thursdays from 6:00-7:20PM.  

In an era of rising transantagonism within feminism, raging wildfires sparked by gender reveal parties, and increasing support for federal legislation that upholds a dymorphic model of sex/gender, it hardly seems like we have passed the “transgender tipping point” as proclaimed by the New York Times in 2014. Certainly, there is more trans representation in media than ever before: more trans characters, plot lines, actors, directors, producers, musicians, politicians, and social media influencers. Yet trans violence is also at an all-time high: more TERFs, more fire, and more legislation, not to mention more homicides, more domestic violence, and more suicide. So if we really have passed a “tipping point,” is it really a point we want to have tipped?

This course introduces students to the field of feminist rhetorics from a transfeminist angle, focusing on issues of legibility and security in light of the seemingly paradoxical situation within which many trans people now find themselves--one of simultaneously heightened visibility and heightened vulnerability. We will prioritize engaging works by and about disabled, Black, Indigenous, and other racialized trans and gender nonconforming people. We will also emphasize connections between our weekly readings and current events as they unfold in real (or recent) time. Assignments will include weekly reflections on the assigned readings, a short presentation, and a formal seminar paper. Dr. Smilges invites all students to contact them prior to the beginning of the semester, so they can ensure access, equity, and accuracy in the course materials, class setup, and student roster (names/pronouns).

Page last updated 5:37 PM, December 7, 2020