Summer 2022 Course Descriptions

ENG 4433.50: Topics in World Literature

Sarah Lennox (slennox@twu.edu)
Fully Online Asynchronous Format

In her poem “To Live in the Borderlands” Gloria Anzaldúa writes, “To survive the Borderlands/you must live sin fronteras/be a crossroads.” In this Topics in World Literature course, we will explore short stories from around the world that consider various aspects of identity—gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic class—with particular attention to characters who live in the literal or figurative “borderlands.” This course will introduce students to short stories from a range of countries such as Mexico, Columbia, Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Malaysia, China, and India.

ENG 5113.50: Studies in World Literature

Sarah Lennox (slennox@twu.edu)
Fully Online Asynchronous Format

In her poem “To Live in the Borderlands” Gloria Anzaldúa writes, “To survive the Borderlands/you must live sin fronteras/be a crossroads.” In this Studies in World Literature course, we will explore short stories from around the world that consider various aspects of identity—gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic class—with particular attention to characters who live in the literal or figurative “borderlands.” This course will introduce students to short stories from a range of countries, such as Mexico, Columbia, Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Malaysia, China, and India.

English 6323: Feminist Rhetoric

Brian Fehler

We'll begin with the notion of "corpus" — body — as it exists in forensic rhetoric in its meaning of "body of legal literature" and "body of precedents," but also, of course, in terms of the "corporeal corpus" in terms of a central tenet as "habeas corpus" — but how that "corpus" was always coded male. We'd then move on to discuss body politics vs. the "body politic", body surveillance, and body (free) movement. Anyway, with Roe v Wade before the courts, could be very interesting and timely. The class will take a historical approach and read primary sources from the classical period forward and consider methodologies of feminist rhetorical historiography.

Texts, which will be supplemented by readings in Canvas:

Joy Ritchie and Kate Ronald, eds. Available Means: An Anthology of Women’s Rhetoric(s). 2001. ISBN: 0-8229-5753-1

2) Lindal Buchanan and Kathleen J. Ryan, eds. Walking and Talking Feminist Rhetorical Practices: Landmark Essays and Controversies. 2010. ISBN: 978-1-60235- 135-6

3) Eileen Schell and K.J. Rawson, eds. Rhetorica in Motion: Feminist Rhetorical Methods and Methodologies. 2010. ISBN: 978-0822-960560

ENG 6403: Cultural Rhetorics

Dundee Lackey (dlackey@twu.edu)
Asynchronous, fully online. 

This section of ENG 6343 will provide a basic introduction to the theories and methodologies useful to research, scholarship, and teaching in cultural rhetorics. Participants in the course will gain broad general knowledge about the theories and methodologies that inform the study of “cultural rhetorics” in the Americas. Additionally, you will be asked to experience the process of theorizing cultural rhetorics. Throughout the course, I’ll ask that you negotiate and think through both the how and the what of our class readings and the field of Rhetoric: what kinds of questions are asked, how are they investigated, what are the consequences of particular processes for producing answers? Ideally, by the end of the semester, you will be able to map relationships between various theories and methodologies across inter/disciplinary boundaries and begin to situate your own scholarly projects within one or more of the interstices of questions, methodologies, theories, and practices that comprise scholarship in cultural rhetorics.

SPAN 1013.50: Elementary Spanish

Staff
Fully online, asynchronous; MTWR 10:10-12:10)

(TCCN SPAN 1411) For students with no previous instruction in Spanish. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours. 

Page last updated 3:45 PM, May 17, 2022