Summer 2021 Course Descriptions

ENG 2073.50 Mythology

Dr. Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu)
100% online, 100% asynchronous.

Semester-specific description (supplementing catalog): We will steep ourselves in a global survey of world mythologies using DK’s visually stimulating The Mythology Book.  Supplementing that overview, we’ll read short works of literature where mythological archetypes (themes) can be discerned. David Burrows’ anthology, Myths and Motifs in Literature, will provide the literary selections. We’ll conclude by watching “The Matrix” and “Wonder Woman” (available on YouTube [$4 each to rent]  and elsewhere). Download the Summer 2021 ENG 2073.50 flyer (pdf) for more detailed information.

ENG 2393.50/WS2393.50 Intro to Literature by Women

Dr. Johnathan Smilges (jsmilges@twu.edu)
Asynchronous: fully online. This class will be conducted 100% online.

Trans women write, too! In this section of “Introduction to Literature by Women,” we will be reading contemporary novels and graphic literature written exclusively by trans women. With rising trans antagonism throughout the United States, as evidenced by ongoing attempts to criminalize trans children’s access to transition-related medicine, it is difficult to believe that have reached the “Transgender Tipping Point,” per the New York Times. This class will attend to how trans women, in particular, are navigating this apparent tension. How are trans women surviving? How are they thriving? How are they building networks of care and communities of resistance that work toward the creation of a better world? Assignments will include short, periodic reflections on assigned readings, weekly discussions, and a final essay. If you have questions or would like to discuss access needs in advance of the first class meeting, please contact Dr. Smilges.

ENG 3153 Multicultural Literature: Recent Latina Literature

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous.

This course will focus on the study of recent Latina literature from various cultures. Although this literature will be from Latina authors, the literature will all be written in English. Some of the literature to be examined will include: Esmeralda Sanitago When I Was Puerto Rican (1993, Puerto Rico), Ana Castillo The Guardians(2007, Mexico), Julia Alvarez In the Time of Butterflies (1994, Dominican Republic), Helana Maria ViramontesUnder the Feet of Jesus (1995, Mexico), and Demetria Martinez Mother Tongue (1994, El Salvador).

ENG 3293.50 American Literature: Realism to the Present

Dr. Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu)
100% online, 100% asynchronous. 

Semester-specific description (supplementing catalog): Great works of literature from the Civil War to the present. Mostly fiction (several short stories and a couple short novels). Some highly accessible poetry. One famous play. Download the Summer 2021 ENG 3293.50 flyer (pdf) for more detailed information.

ENG 4453.50 Genre Studies: Contemporary America Poetry

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous.

This course will focus on American poetry published between 1960 until present. Poets who will be studied shall include: Gwendolyn Brooks, Lucille Clifton, Billy Collins, Rita Dove, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Hayden, Yusef Komunyakaa, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, Charles Simic, Gary Snyder, Gary Soto, C. K. Williams, Charles Wright, and James Wright, who penned, “In a pine tree, / A few yards away from my window sill, / A brilliant blue jay is springing up and down, up and down, / On a branch. / I laugh, as I see him abandon himself / To entire delight, for he knows as well as I do / That the branch will not break” (from “Two Hangovers,” lines 30-36).

ENG 5263.50 Studies in American Literature: Southern Literature

Dr. Phyllis Bridges (pbridges@twu.edu)
June 1-July 2. 100% online, asynchronous.

The course offers all students an opportunity to explore such literary luminaries as William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, Tennessee Williams, James Dickey, Margaret Alexander, among others.

Various genres of the essay, fiction, drama, and poetry are included to reflect the diversity and range of modern Southern literature.  Each student will have choices for texts for concentration.

ENG 5433.50 Genre Studies: Contemporary America Poetry

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)
Fully online, asynchronous.

This course will focus on American poetry published between 1960 until present. Poets who will be studied shall include: Gwendolyn Brooks, Lucille Clifton, Billy Collins, Rita Dove, Allen Ginsberg, Robert Hayden, Yusef Komunyakaa, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, Charles Simic, Gary Snyder, Gary Soto, C. K. Williams, Charles Wright, and James Wright, who penned, “In a pine tree, / A few yards away from my window sill, / A brilliant blue jay is springing up and down, up and down, / On a branch. / I laugh, as I see him abandon himself / To entire delight, for he knows as well as I do / That the branch will not break” (from “Two Hangovers,” lines 30-36).

ENG 5593.50 Studies in Literature by Women

Dr. Johnathan Smilges (jsmilges@twu.edu)
Asynchronous: fully online. This class will be conducted 100% online.

Trans women write, too! In this section of “Studies in Literature by Women,” we will be reading contemporary novels, graphic literature, poetry, and memoirs written exclusively by trans women. With rising trans antagonism throughout the United States, as evidenced by recent attempts to criminalize trans children’s access to transition-related medicine, it is difficult to believe that have reached the “Transgender Tipping Point,” per the New York Times. This class will attend to how trans women, in particular, are navigating this apparent tension. How are trans women surviving? How are they thriving? How are they building networks of care and communities of resistance that work toward the creation of a better world? Assignments will include short reflections on assigned readings, weekly discussions, a midterm teaching portfolio, and a final conference-length paper. If you have questions or would like to discuss access needs in advance of the first class meeting, please contact Dr. Smilges.

ENG 6403.50 Studies in Writing and Rhetoric: Writing Program Administration

Drs. Jackie Hoermann-Elliott and Rachel Daugherty (jhelliott@twu.edu, rdaugherty1@twu.edu)
Synchronous (with online asynchronous work). W 3:00-5:00 on 6/2, 6/16, 6/30, 7/14, and 7/28. 

Do you think you might want to lead a writing program one day? Consider signing up for this summer course offering, co-taught by Drs. Daugherty and Elliott. Through both asynchronous modules and biweekly synchronous sessions, we'll unpack what it means to be a writing program administrator (WPA) from a variety of angles. Topics covered may include but are not limited to the following: the history of the field, writing across the curriculum (WAC), writing center theory and practice, the postmodern state of WPA work, crafting internal and external programmatic documents, and developing an administrative statement for the job market. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours

Page last updated 3:17 PM, April 12, 2021