Summer 2020 Courses

English

ENG 2073.50: Mythology (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Stephen Souris (ssouris@twu.edu

Online

We will steep ourselves in a global survey of world mythologies using DK’s visually stimulating The Mythology Book.  Supplementing that overview, we’ll read short works of literature where mythological archetypes (themes) can be discerned. David Burrows’ anthology, Myths and Motifs in Literature, will provide the literary selections. We’ll conclude by watching “The Matrix” and “Wonder Woman” (available on YouTube and elsewhere). This offering of the course is designed to fit comfortably within the summer semester.  Copies of the required books will be on reserve. A detailed flyer is available here

ENG/WS 2393.50 Introduction to Literature by Women (June 1-July 3)

Dr. Phyllis Bridges (pbridges@twu.edu)

Online 

TextbooksGreat Short Stories by American Women (Dover Thrift Edition), edited by Candace  Ward, Great Poems by American Women (Dover Thrift Edition), edited by Susan Rattiner, Short Story Masterpieces by American Women Writers (Dover Thrift Edition), edited by Clarence Strowbridge. The textbooks are available from many online vendors as well as in the TWU Bookstore. The books are reasonably priced. In addition to the materials contained in the three textbooks, there will be items on Canvas.

Plan for the course: This introductory course allows an opportunity to engage in the study of important works from a literary and women’s studies perspective. Texts from the early days of the Republic to contemporary times are included. Authors from multiple ethnicities and works in various genres will provide many options to expand knowledge and understanding.

ENG 3013.50: British Literature to 1760 (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Liam Lanigan (llanigan@twu.edu

Online

Examines significant works in depth with study of authors and genres in relation to the aesthetic, historical, and cultural contexts. Requires research with primary and secondary sources. 

ENG 3063.50: Poetry (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Stephen Souris (ssouris@twu.edu)

Online

Contemporary Texas poets writing mostly in relatively accessible free verse.  We’ll focus on the volumes in the “Texas Poets Laureate Series” published by Texas Christian University Press.  The poets in the series are James Hoggard, Dave Parsons, Alan Birkelbach, Paul Ruffin, Larry Thomas, Red Steagall, Steven Fromholz, Jan Seale,  Karla Morton, Walt McDonald, Carmen Tafolla, Carol Coffee Reposa, and Jenny Browne. A half-price deal for TWU students has been negotiated with the publisher.  Optional activities will include: 1) discussion of the recordings in the Texas Poets Podcast series, hosted by Dr. Souris; 2) projects through the Enhanced Educational Experience Plan geared toward presentation at the next Langdon Review Weekend (an annual gathering of Texas poets near Fort Worth).  Regarding #2: Students in previous offerings of this course have presented their own poems written in response to assigned poems by Texas Poets Laureate.  This year, we will also experiment (as an optional exercise) with videotaped performances of assigned poems (pre-mastery and then post-mastery). This offering of the course is designed to fit comfortably within this summer semester.  A detailed flyer is available here.

ENG 3203.50: Advanced Grammar and Composition (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)

Online

This course focuses not only on the basic terminology and procedures of English grammar, rhetoric, and composition, but is tailored specifically for those looking to teach in the future. As part of the course design, students will compose teaching activities, which include designing formal writing assignments, informal writing assignments, lesson plans, and a basic understanding of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, which are the standards set up by the state of Texas for what students should be able to do and know.

ENG 3293.50: American Literature: Realism to the Present (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Guy Litton (alitton@twu.edu)

Online

Major prose and poetry written in the United States during the Realistic Period up to and including the present studied chronologically. Artistry and technique of the works studied along with some attention to the periods in which the works were written and read.

ENG 4353.50: Topics in American Literature -- Latina Literature (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)

Online

This course will focus on the readings of U.S. Latina literature, which includes women of Mexican, Cuba, Dominican, and Puerto Rican decent. Each of the readings are from the very late 20th century and 21st century. Issues of identity will be examined as well as cultural, personal, and historic trauma. A tentative list of books include: 

  • Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands / La Frontera
  • Sandra Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek
  • Cherrie Moraga, Heroes and Saints and Other Plays 
  • Helena Maria Viramontes, Under the Feet of Jesus
  • Esmeralda Santiago, When I Was Puerto Rican 
  • Julia Alvarez, In the Time of the Butterflies 
  • Demetria Martínez, Mother Tongue
  • Ana Castillo, The Guardians
  • Alina Troyano, I, Carmelita Tropicana 
  • Edwidge Danticat, The Farming of Bones 

ENG 4913.50: Independent Study (Methods of Teaching English) (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Aimee Myers (amyers8@twu.edu)

Online
****Students planning to student teach in Fall 2020 or Spring 2021 MUST enroll in this course. Contact Dr. Bender (abender@twu.edu) for the registration code.****

Effective methods of teaching English, including structuring small-group and whole-class activities and discussions, teaching composition, encouraging students' close reading of texts through rhetorical analysis and literary criticism, and producing technologically-enhanced classroom presentations.

ENG 5263.50: Studies in American Literature -- Latina Literature (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)

Online

This course will focus on the readings of U.S. Latina literature, which includes women of Mexican, Cuba, Dominican, and Puerto Rican decent. Each of the readings are from the very late 20th century and 21st century. Issues of identity (including constructions of ethnicity and nationality; hybridity; and issues with assimilations and cultural preservation) will be examined as well as cultural, personal, and historic trauma. In addition to critical readings, the tentative list of books include: 

  • Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands / La Frontera
  • Sandra Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek
  • Cherrie Moraga, Heroes and Saints and Other Plays 
  • Helena Maria Viramontes, Under the Feet of Jesus
  • Esmeralda Santiago, When I Was Puerto Rican 
  • Julia Alvarez, In the Time of the Butterflies 
  • Demetria Martínez, Mother Tongue
  • Ana Castillo, The Guardians
  • Alina Troyano, I, Carmelita Tropicana 
  • Edwidge Danticat, The Farming of Bones 

ENG 6313.50: ENG 6313: Rhetorical Criticism and Discourse: Analysis Formation and Transformation: Networks of Subversion and Coalition (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Brian Fehler (bfehler@twu.edu)

"Black set out to rattle the foundations of what he called traditional 'neo-Aristotelian' criticism, and he went to his task with spirit. The result is both articulate and provocative.” --Review of Black’s Rhetorical Criticism in Speech Teacher (now Communication Education)

When Edwin Black’s Rhetorical Criticism: A Study in Method appeared in 1965, it roared onto the disciplinary stage with the vigor and spirit of a stump-speaker’s oratory. Black’s intent was to challenge the profession of rhetorical criticism, which was, it must be said, fairly staid and safe at the time, adhering almost exclusively to principles of neo-Aristotelianism. In the middle of that decade of social upheaval, Black’s book helped pave a way for new kinds of criticism, including movements criticisms: so important in that era of Civil Rights, feminist, and queer social movements. In this class, we will explore and recover the so often ignored (these days) discipline-shaking appearance of Black’s book in terms of its promised potential to re-shape the discipline. Did it? From our perspective, we will be able to answer that question and also trace the many transformative methods of rhetorical criticism that have emerged since 1965. Among the major developments, primarily starting in the 1970s, was Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA).

Readings by Edwin Black, Wayne Booth, Karlyn Kohrs Campbell, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Sonja Foss, Jose Esteban Muñoz, Marie Hochmuth Nicholls, Celeste Michelle Conditt, Shirley Wilson Logan, Audre Lorde, Barbara Johnstone, Laurie Gries, Jenny Edbauer, and others!

ENG 6403.50: Studies in Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of Activism, Propaganda, and Disinformation (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. Dundee Lackey (dlackey@twu.edu)

Hybrid: The class meets in person June 3, July 8, and TBD

Directed investigation of advanced rhetorical or composition theory and practice within a selected field, mode, or area of inquiry. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Spanish

SPAN 1013.50: Elementary Spanish I (June 1-July 2)

Dr. Lynn Healy

Online Synchronous Instruction: M/T/W/Th 6:00-8:00 PM

SPAN 1023.50: Elementary Spanish (July 6-Aug. 7)

Instructor TBA

Online Synchronous Instruction: M/T/W/Th 6:00-8:00 PM

SPAN 2033.50 Intermediate Spanish I (June 1-Aug. 7)

Dr. William Benner (wbenner@twu.edu)

Online Synchronous Instruction: M/W 6:00-8:00 PM

Grammar, composition, oral-aural practice, and readings. Development of skills in interpersonal communication, presentational speaking and writing, interpretive listening, and interpretive writing. Prerequisite: SPAN 1023 or equivalent. Three lecture hours a week.

SPAN 2043.01 Intermediate Spanish I

Angela Mooney (Fall 2020)

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00AM - 12:20PM (ASB Room 304)

Continuation of SPAN 2033 with progressively more advanced work. Grammar, composition, oral-aural practice, and readings. Development of skills in interpersonal communication, presentational speaking and writing, interpretive listening, and interpretive writing. Prerequisite: SPAN 2033 or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SPAN 3153.50 Advanced Grammar, Composition, and Literature I

R. Rodriguez (Fall 2020)

Synchronous Internet Instruction: Tuesday/Thursday 07:30PM - 08:50PM

SPAN 3153 Advanced Grammar, Composition, and Literature I: The development of writing and reading skills and vocabulary in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 2043 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SPAN 3173.01 Spanish for the Professions I

Dr. William Benner (Fall 2020)

MW 11:00-12:20 (WH Room 209)

SPAN 3173 Spanish for the Professions I: Instruction and practice in understanding and speaking Spanish encountered in various professions, business, community health, criminal justice, social work, sociology, OT, PT, oral healthcare workplace and mass communications. Prerequisites: SPAN 1043, SPAN 2043, or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SPAN 3173.50 Spanish for the Professions I

Dr. William Benner (Fall 2020)

Synchronous Internet Instruction: Tuesday, Thursday 01:00PM - 02:20PM 

Instruction and practice in understanding and speaking Spanish encountered in various professions, business, community health, criminal justice, social work, sociology, OT, PT, oral healthcare workplace and mass communications. Prerequisites: SPAN 1043, SPAN 2043, or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

Page last updated 5:03 PM, April 7, 2020