Fall 2021 Course Descriptions

SPAN 3153.01 Span Gram Comp and Lit I

Dr. William Benner (wbenner@twu.edu
Online, Synchronous. MW 1:00pm-2:20pm. 

The development of writing and reading skills and vocabulary in Spanish.

SPAN 3173.50 Spanish for the Professions I

Dr. William Benner (wbenner@twu.edu
Online, Synchronous. TTR 11:00am-12:20pm. 

***Prerequisites: SPAN 2043, or permission of instructor.***
Instruction and practice in understanding and speaking Spanish encountered in various medical professions.

SPAN 3173.51 Spanish For the Professions I 

Dr. William Benner (wbenner@twu.edu)  
Online, Synchronous. TTR 1:00pm-2:20pm. 

***Prerequisites: SPAN 2043, or permission of instructor.***
Instruction and practice in understanding and speaking Spanish encountered in various medical professions.

ENG 2073 Mythology

Dr. Ashley Bender (abender@twu.edu)
Fully online with synchronous session. M 1:00-2:20.

Welcome to world mythology! According to the catalog description, this course is “a survey of world mythologies and their global influence on the fine art and literature.” All in all, sounds pretty okay, but I’d like to add to this description. This course is also an opportunity to explore myth in the modern world and to contemplate the ways that myths both old and new continue to permeate our culture as we look back to ancient mythologies and as we create our own. This course is also an opportunity to experience the pleasure of recognizing textual allusions of seeing how our knowledge of mythology can enhance our scholarly and personal pursuits. While we'll explore a range of mythologies, we'll focus especially on Egyptian, West African, and Norse mythologies, concluding with a unit on Neil Gaiman's American Gods

ENG/WS 2393.50 Introduction to Literature by Women

Dr. Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu)
100% online, 100% asynchronous. 

Semester-specific description (supplementing catalog):  Great short stories by American women writers since the Civil War and including contemporary writers.  Our focus will be on the stories themselves and not any particular theoretical approach to women’s literature. Three inexpensive anthologies will be used to have the best possible selection from which to choose stories that are good for discussion. Download the Fall 2021 ENG-WS 2393.50 flyer (pdf) for more detailed information.

ENG 3283.50/51 American Literature: Colonial to Romantic

Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu
100% online, 100% asynchronous.

Semester-specific description (supplementing catalog):  A multicultural survey of classics from the 17th century up to the Civil War.  Writers covered:  Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Mary Rowlandson, Ben Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, and Emily Dickinson. Download the Fall 2021 ENG 3283.50-51 flyer (pdf) for more detailed information.

ENG 4353.50 Topics in American Literature: Texas Poets Laureate

Dr. Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu
100% online, 100% asynchronous. 

Semester-specific description (supplementing catalog):  Contemporary Texas poets writing mostly in relatively accessible free verse.  We’ll focus on the volumes in the “Texas Poet Laureate Series” published by Texas Christian University Press.  The poets in the series are James Hoggard, Dave Parsons, Alan Birkelbach, Paul Ruffin, Larry Thomas, Red Steagall, Steven Fromholz, Jan Seale,  Karla Morton, Walt McDonald, Carmen Tafolla, Carol Coffee Reposa, Jenny Browne, and Laurie Ann Guererro.  A special half-price deal for TWU students has been negotiated with the publisher.  Optional activities will include: 1) discussion of the recordings in the Texas Poets Podcast series, hosted by Dr. Souris; 2) projects through the Enhanced Educational Experience Plan geared toward presentation at the next Langdon Review Weekend (an annual gathering of Texas poets near Fort Worth).  Regarding #2: Students in previous offerings of this course have presented their own poems written in response to assigned poems by Texas Poets Laureate.  This year, we will also experiment (as an optional exercise) with videotaped performances of assigned poems (pre-mastery and then post-mastery).  Download the Fall 2021 ENG 4353.50 flyer (pdf) for more detailed information.

ENG 4983 Capstone

Dr. Ashley Bender (abender@twu.edu)
Fully online with synchronous session. W 1:00-2:20.

Join us as we learn to navigate the path from undergraduate students to post-baccalaureate life, be that graduate school, professional programs, or entry into your profession of choice. In this course, we'll begin work on our exit portfolios and consider the benefits of building a professional portfolio; we'll develop application and professional materials such as resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles; we'll research our chosen professions through informational interviews and investigations into current debates in the field; and we'll hear from English majors (many of them TWU alums!) who've put their English degrees to work. Finally, we'll learn how to translate the much-sought-after skill sets of the English/humanities major for potential employers.

ENG 5103.01 Intro to Graduate Studies in English

Dr. Johnathan Smilges (jsmilges@twu.edu)
Hybrid: partly face-to-face, partly online. This class will be conducted 50% online.

Welcome to graduate school! Whatever your journey to get here, I’m so glad you’ve made it. I’m excited to learn from you, and I hope you’re excited to learn from one another, too. In this course, you will be given a lot information across a wide variety of topics, including the structure of English departments, the genre(s) of academic writing, the function of seminars, the process toward graduation (at both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels), the potential career opportunities following conferral of your degree, the range of fields that fall under “English,” and so much more. As a hybrid section, our class will meet face-to-face every other week for synchronous meetings. The remainder of the course will be conducted asynchronously online through discussions, periodic reflection papers, and a series of strategic planning assignments to help set you up for future success. If you have questions or would like to discuss access needs in advance of the first class meeting, please contact Dr. Smilges.

ENG 5343.01 Rhetoric & Composition Theory

Dr. Jackie Hoermann-Elliott (jhelliott@twu.edu)
Hybrid (with online asynchronous work). M 6:00-07:50.

This course takes a broad strokes approach to introducing graduate students to theory and research in composition pedagogy with special emphasis on preparation for teaching college composition in face-to-face and digital contexts. Students will explore composition as it has evolved from current-traditional approaches to present day approaches that make space for dialogue about a range of topics--from embodied learning to anti-racist pedagogy. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5403.01 Studies in British Literature to 1760

Dr. Ashley Bender (abender@twu.edu)
Fully online with synchronous session T, 6:00-8:00.

Satire was undoubtedly one of the most important rhetorical modes of the long eighteenth century, and its practitioners during this period are some of the best satirists in English-language literature. This seminar will explore satirical form and function during this rather lengthy period. Authors under consideration will include John Dryden, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, and Samuel Johnson, though we will contextualize this roll-call of literary superstars with other satirists of the period, including female authors such as Aphra Behn, Anne Finch, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Our study would be incomplete without knowledge of these authors’ forebears; thus we will also examine the formal verse satire of Horace and Juvenal, who provide models for, and whose works were often translated and imitated by, these later authors. We will also explore the visual rhetoric of eighteenth-century satirical print culture. What the satire of this period reveal about writing and the role of literature and language in society? What does it reveal about social understandings of gender, sex, and class? Of all the questions we will seek to answer, though, perhaps the most important is “why?” Why satire? Why was this genre so appealing to so many authors? What are the limits of its usefulness? Does the entrenchment in the specific that is so characteristic of satire preclude universal application? How do authors use their satirical personae as a means of authorial self-fashioning?

5903.51 Special Topics: Texas Poets Laureate

 

Stephen Souris (SSouris@twu.edu
100% online, 100% asynchronous.

Contemporary Texas poets writing mostly in relatively accessible free verse. We’ll focus on the volumes in the “Texas Poet Laureate Series” published by Texas Christian University Press.  The poets in the series are James Hoggard, Dave Parsons, Alan Birkelbach, Paul Ruffin, Larry Thomas, Red Steagall, Steven Fromholz, Jan Seale,  Karla Morton, Walt McDonald, Carmen Tafolla, Carol Coffee Reposa, Jenny Browne, and Laurie Ann Guerrero.  A special half-price deal for TWU students has been negotiated with the publisher (see below).  Optional activities will include: 1) discussion of the recordings in the Texas Poets Podcast series, as well as discussion of the recordings from Professor’s Corner sessions at the Denton Public Library on Texas Poets Laureate—all hosted by Dr. Souris; 2) projects geared toward presentation at the next Langdon Review Weekend (an annual gathering of Texas poets near Fort Worth). Students in previous offerings of this course have presented their own poems written in response to assigned poems by Texas Poets Laureate. Download the Fall 2021 ENG 5903.51 flyer (pdf) for more detailed information.

ENG 6083 Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition

Dr. Rachel Daugherty (rdaugherty1@twu.edu)
T 6:00 PM-8:00 PM hybrid (with online asynchronous work)

Working knowledge of research methods is essential for every scholar, teacher, and researcher. This course introduces graduate students to qualitative and quantitative research methods in rhetoric and composition such as textual, ethnographic, historical, archival, and empirical analysis. Students will learn to discriminate among types of research, examine scholarship critically, and select appropriate research designs. Students will design and conduct research through qualitative and mixed methods in seminar projects. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

Page last updated 10:36 AM, May 5, 2021