Fall 2020 Courses

English

ENG 2013.50: English Literary Masterpieces

Dr. Russell Greer (rgreer@twu.edu

Online 

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language, Philosophy, & Culture****

In fall 2020, we will study four major works from the nineteenth century (the British Romantic and Victorian Periods): Lyrical Ballads (1798, 1800, 1802, 1805) by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge; Pride and Prejudice (1813) by Jane Austen; Aurora Leigh (1856) by Elizabeth Barrett Browning; and Jude the Obscure (1895) by Thomas Hardy.

ENG 2073.01: Mythology

Instructor TBA

T/Th 1:00-2:20

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language, Philosophy, & Culture) and the Global Perspectives Requirement***

ENG 2073.50: Mythology

Dr. Gray Scott (grayscott@twu.edu)

Online

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum (Language, Philosophy, & Culture) and the Global Perspectives Requirement***

Roughly six-thousand years ago, archaeologists and linguists believe, a culture in the grassy steppes around what is today Ukraine tamed the horse, discovered the wheel, and worshipped a thundering sky god: Dyḗus Ph2tḗr, which, depending on how you tweak the pronunciation, sounds a bit like either Zeus Father or Jus Piter--and is likely the origin of both. In fact, this one proto culture appears to be the origin of languages and mythologies from the Celtic to Norse to the Hindu. Our online mythology course will explore this extended family of myths and what can and cannot be learned about a lost culture from the stories it has left behind. 

ENG/WS 2393.50&51 Intro to Literature by Women

Dr. Stephen Souris (ssouris@twu.edu)

Online

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum: Language, Philosophy, & Culture OR Component Area Option***

Great short stories by American women writers since the Civil War and including contemporary writers. Our focus will be on the stories themselves and not any particular theoretical approach to women’s literature. Three inexpensive anthologies will be used to have the best possible selection from which to choose stories that are good for discussion. A detailed flyer is here.

ENG/WS 2393.90 Honors Intro to Literature by Women

Dr. Brian Fehler (bfehler@twu.edu)

Hybrid: T, 9:30-11:00; online

***Satisfies 3 hours of the Core Curriculum: Language, Philosophy, & Culture OR Component Area Option***

ENG 3013.01: British Literature to 1760

Dr. Vivian Casper (vcasper@twu.edu)

T/Th 9:30-10:50 

This course is a survey of English literary masterpieces beginning with "Beowulf" in the Old English period and progressing up through the 18th Century.  The knowledge gained in this course is that which all educated persons should know. We will discuss the material according to literary periods with attention paid to genre characteristics, important verse patterns, themes, and poetic techniques.  These great works of literature are in verse form or drama form. We will have three major examinations, one research project, and possibilities for extra credit.

ENG 3033.01: Intro to the Study of World Literature

Dr. Gretchen Busl (gbusl@twu.edu)

M/W 1:00-2:20

***Satisfies Global Perspectives requirement.***

Study of ancient, classical, medieval, and modern literature, with a stress on the intercultural relationships reflected through the translation and transmission of texts. This particular course will focus on those intercultural relationships that develop through the modes of adaptation and translation. We will examine cross-cultural adaptations from both Western and non-Western nations, in order to investigate how cultures come into contact through literature. You will be introduced to various methods of literary and cultural analysis and to various theoretical models of interpretation. We will probe questions such as “What does it mean to read a text in translation?” “What is World Literature?” and “Is there such a thing as a ‘global’ text?”

ENG 3033.50: Intro to the Study of World Literature

Instructor TBA

Online

***Satisfies Global Perspectives requirement.***

Study of ancient, classical, medieval, and modern literature, with a stress on the intercultural relationships reflected through the translation and transmission of texts.

ENG 3043.01: Drama

Dr. Vivian Casper (vcaspter@twu.edu)

MW 9:30-10:50 

We will survey drama from its beginnings in Greece to European and American modern and contemporary times. Approximately nine plays will be studied. Because plays will be selected based on what performances will be available in the area, play selections will be published later (please know that area theatres are uncertain during this time of constraints on human movement what their offerings will be).  Depending on the plays selected, I will choose either an anthology or individual play texts for our study. Attendance at these plays will be free to students, who will also receive extra credit for their attendance. Three major examinations and a research project are required.

ENG/WS 3073.50 Literature by Women

Dr. Phyllis Bridges (pbridges@twu.edu)

Online 

Textbook:The Vintage Book of American Women Writers, edited by Elaine Showalter. The textbooks are available from many online vendors as well as in the TWU Bookstore.  The book is reasonably priced. In addition to the materials contained in the textbook, there will be items on Canvas

Plan for the Course: Advanced study of literature by women. The focus for Fall 2020 will be modern short stories and poems by American women authors and writings of women on suffrage in recognition of the centennial of the 19th amendment to the Constitution giving women the right to vote.

ENG 3113.01 Introduction to English Studies

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)

T/Th 06:00-7:20 

***Required for all English Majors. We encourage you to enroll in this course during your last semester as a sophomore or your first semester as a junior.***

Mandatory for English majors, this course is divided between Composition and Rhetoric, and Literature and Criticism. Each half of the class examines allows for an introduction and greater understanding the paths a student will take over the course of their major. Additionally, the course is designed to help students decide what they would like to do with their degree and think about their plans after graduation. 

ENG 3203.02: Advanced Grammar & Comp

Dr. Vivian Casper (vcasper2@twu.edu)

T/Th 11:00-12:20

****This section is for students who are NOT on the teacher cert track**** 

This course will have two kinds of objectives:  learning the conventions of formal writing with attention paid to rhetorical principles and mastering the knowledge of English grammar, including the diagramming of the four types of sentences.  Four five-page papers and four grammar quizzes are required. A rhetoric text in an early edition may be ordered online at very low cost. The grammar text may be bought used online or used or rented at the TWU Bookstore.  When you finish this course successfully, you will be prepared to write or edit material professionally.

ENG 3203.50 Advanced Grammar & Comp

Dr. Jamie Barker (jbarker2@twu.edu)

Hybrid: Th 2:30-3:50, online 

****This section is for teacher certification students only****

This course focuses not only on the basic terminology and procedures of English grammar, rhetoric, and composition, but is tailored specifically for those looking to teach in the future. As part of the course design, students will compose teaching activities, which include designing formal writing assignments, informal writing assignments, lesson plans, and a basic understanding of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, which are the standards set up by the state of Texas for what students should be able to do and know. 

ENG 3233.50: Advanced Expository Writing

Dr. Gray Scott (grayscott@twu.edu)

Online Synchronous: T 1:00-2:00 synchronous, the rest asynchronous

We depend a great deal on professional explainers. On scientists who can tell the public how something works. On doctors who can explain pandemics—and how best to respond to them. And one of the skills all such explainers have in common is that they're adept at blending genres of writing that most students often have only practiced in isolation. A single feature might include elements of interview-based profiles, direct observation, a dash of argument, a flash of memory. For this course, we will study how professional journalists write these most complicated features and we will practice writing them ourselves. 

ENG 3283.50 & 3283.51: American Literature: Colonial through Romantic

Dr. Stephen Souris (ssouris@twu.edu)

Online

A multicultural survey of classics from the 17th century up to the Civil War. Writers covered: Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Mary Rowlandson, Ben Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, and Emily Dickinson. 100% online. Detailed course flyer here

ENG 3363: Introduction to Linguistics

Dr. Matt Brown (mbrown39@twu.edu)

T/Th 7:20-8:50

ENG 4423.01 Topics in British Literature: The British Novel

Dr. Ashley Bender (abender@twu.edu)

W 6:00-8:50

Although the dominant genre in today’s literary culture, that novel thing called the novel was once so stigmatized that some preachers, parents, and propagandists suggested they would corrupt the youth of society, a cultural gateway drug that could lead to inflamed passions, bad moral character, and--perhaps scariest of all--young people and servants alike forgetting their place in society. This course will trace the development of the British novel from the taboo but titillating feminocentric amatory fiction of the late seventeenth century, to the moral masterpieces of mid-century, and finally to the often troubling global transactions that take place in the transatlantic novel. We will necessarily contextualize our readings with an understanding of the historical, political, economic, and cultural contexts of this dynamic time period by engaging with both primary and secondary documents produced alongside the novels that we read. Authors will include Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Penelope Aubin, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, and France Burney, among others.  

ENG 4473.01 Queer Rhetorics in Crisis (Topics in Writing & Rhetoric)

Dr. Johnathan Smilges

M/W 11:00-12:20

If queer folks know how to do anything well, it’s to survive a crisis. By “survive,” I don’t mean to suggest that queer folks don’t die—we certainly do. What I mean is that queer people learn from an early age how to live in crisis, to live on through crisis, and to forge relationships with others in spite of crisis. It could be said that crisis—whether in our families, our schools, our communities, or our countries—is what drives queerness to begin with: we are rendered queer by the alleged crisis of our being in the world. We are embodied crises surviving crises.

This course adopts rhetorical theory as a guiding heuristic to explore the ways crisis informs queer identities, aesthetics, and resistance efforts. From carceral logics, to medical models, to the AIDS epidemic, queer people have long wrestled with existing crisis discourses to understand themselves. And in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are reminded that among the chief aims of queer rhetorics is to unpack how these crisis discourses simultaneously oppress queer people, even as they make possible new forms of intimacy and kinship. It is this tension between oppression and possibility that will drive our class discussions and, perhaps, help us to imagine new modes of survival for our own individual and collective crises.

ENG 4953.01: Internship

Contact Dr. Bender (abender@twu.edu) if you are interested in earning course credit for an internship.

ENG 4983.50: Senior Capstone in English

Dr. Russell Greer (rgreer@twu.edu)

Online synchronous: M 6:00-7:00 synchronous; the rest asynchronous

***Required for all English Majors on the Literature and Writing & Rhetoric tracks. If you plan to graduate in Fall 2020, Spring 2021, or Summer 2021, you must enroll in 4983 this fall.***

In fall 2020, we will (1) hear from a variety of guest speakers in fields associated with English (i.e. technical writers, educators, novelists, etc.), (2) study some advanced revision skills, (3) prepare documents and practice skills needed to enter the workforce, and (4) completely revise two research papers for inclusion in the graduation portfolios. 

ENG 5103: Intro to Grad Studies in English

Dr. Dundee Lackey (dlackey@twu.edu)

T 6:00-8:50

Introduction to English study at the graduate level, with attention to scholarly conventions and to common analytical and critical practices. Required enrollment in first fall semester.

ENG 5113.50: Studies in World Literature: Migration Narratives 

Dr. Gretchen Busl (gbusl@twu.edu)

Online

This course will explore how categories such as pilgrim, pioneer, tourist, transient, refugee, fugitive, immigrant, and exile are rhetorically constructed and contested in film and literature. We will investigate narratives which focus on moving from place to place by choice and by force, both across and within borders. We will draw from a theoretical framework of migration studies, narrative theory, and cultural rhetorics to consider how negotiations of identity such as adaptation, resistance, assimilation, and hybridity are represented in both fiction and non-fiction.

ENG 5343.01 Rhetoric & Composition Theory

Dr. Jacquelyn Hoermann-Elliott

M 6:00-08:50 

This course takes a broad strokes approach to introducing graduate students to theory and research in composition pedagogy with special emphasis on preparation for teaching college composition in face-to-face and digital contexts. Students will explore composition as it has evolved from current-traditional approaches to present day approaches that make space for dialogue about a range of topics--from embodied learning to anti-racist pedagogy. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5403.01 Studies in British Literature to 1760: The Early British Novel

Dr. Ashley Bender (abender@twu.edu)

W 6:00-8:50

Although the dominant genre in today’s literary culture, that novel thing called the novel was once so stigmatized that some preachers, parents, and propagandists suggested they would corrupt the youth of society, a cultural gateway drug that could lead to inflamed passions, bad moral character, and--perhaps scariest of all--young people and servants alike forgetting their place in society. This course will trace the development of the British novel from the taboo but titillating feminocentric amatory fiction of the late seventeenth century, to the moral masterpieces of mid-century, and finally to the often troubling global transactions that take place in the transatlantic novel. We will necessarily contextualize our readings with an understanding of the historical, political, economic, and cultural contexts of this dynamic time period by engaging with both primary and secondary documents produced alongside the novels that we read. Authors will include Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Penelope Aubin, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, and France Burney, among others.

ENG 6213.01: History of Rhetoric II

Dr. Matt Brown (mbrown39@twu.edu)

W 6:00-8:50

ENG 6403.01: Studies in Writing and Rhetoric: Archive and Survive: The Writing In and the Writing About Archives and Rhetorical Power Relations

Dr. Brian Fehler (bfehler@twu.edu)

T/Th 6:00-08:50 

David Gold, one of our leading archival scholars in rhetoric and composition, did his dissertation research in the library at TWU. Though a student at Michigan in the 1990s, he understood the value of examining the special collections of a historic woman’s university. His dissertation was later revised and published as Rhetoric at the Margins.

Gold’s dissertation and monograph are examples of the great potential to be found for rhetoric and composition scholars in local, public, university, and private archives--because such archives are often, as the title of a collection by Carr, Schultz, and Carr suggests, archives of instruction. That is, these archives often reveal, of course, writing (as they contain so many genres of documents!) but also the ways in which writing was taught and documents were conventionally shaped.

In doing so, these archives also reveal ways in which writing and archiving provided, and continue to provide, an avenue of survival for people who have not, and perhaps still do not, have access to traditional avenues of public writing and powerful literacy (to use a term of Patrick Finn’s).

In this class, then, we will read archive theory specifically written by scholars of rhetoric and composition who focus their work on archives’ relation to systems of power. Students will be asked to visit at least one archive with attention to that archive’s papers that address writing, instruction, powerful literacy, and power relations. Dr. Fehler will lead visits to the general special collections at TWU, to the (very good) LGBTQ Collection at the UNT library, and the tremendous collection at the too-little known U.S. National Archive in Fort Worth. Distance students who cannot take one of these organized tours can visit an archive or special collection in their locality. (As a personal note, one of Dr. Fehler’s first publications emerged from work he conducted in a graduate class on archives, work he conducted at Fort Worth’s National Archives and the public library special collections!)

Ideally, several panels on archives of instruction will emerge from this class that will be suitable for proposal to CCCC, RSA, or other conferences.

Readings include selections from the following:

  • Carr, Schultz, and Carr, Archives of InstructionDonahue and Moon, Local Histories: Reading the Archives of Composition
  • Jessica Enoch, Refiguring Rhetorical Education: Women Teaching African American, Native American, and Chicano/a Students
  • David Gold, Rhetoric at the MarginsOstergaard and Wood, In the Archives of Composition: Writing and Rhetoric in High Schools and Normal Schools
  • Alexis Ramsey, et al. Working in the Archives: Practical Research Methods for Rhetoric and Composition
  • Nathan Shepley, Placing the History of College Writing: Stories from the Incomplete Archive

Spanish

SPAN 1013.01: Elementary Spanish I

Instructor TBA

T/Th 9:30-10:50

SPAN 1013.02: Elementary Spanish I

Instructor TBA

T/Th 11:00-12:20

For students with no previous instruction in Spanish. 

SPAN 1013.03: Elementary Spanish I

Dr. Angela Mooney (amooney4@twu.edu)

T/Th 9:30-10:50

SPAN 1013.06: Elementary Spanish I

Instructor TBA

M/W 1:00-2:20

SPAN 1013.07: Elementary Spanish I

Instructor TBA

M/W 9:30-10:50

SPAN 1013.01: Elementary Spanish I

Instructor TBA

T/Th 9:30-10:50

SPAN 1013.50: Elementary Spanish I

Dr. Lynn Healey (lhealey@twu.edu)

Online Synchronous: M/W 6:00-7:20

SPAN 1023.02: Elementary Spanish II

Dr. William Benner (wbenner@twu.edu)

M/W 9:30-10:50

Continuation of SPAN 1013

SPAN 2033.01: Intermediate Spanish I

Dr. Angela Mooney (amooney4@twu.edu)

T/Th 9:30-10:50

Grammar, composition, oral-aural practice, and readings. Development of skills in interpersonal communication, presentational speaking and writing, interpretive listening, and interpretive writing.

SPAN 2033.50: Intermediate Spanish I

Dr. Rubén Rodríguez-Jiménez (rrodriguezjimenez@twu.edu)

Online Synchronous: T/Th 6:00-7:20

SPAN 2043.01: Intermediate Spanish II

Dr. Angela Mooney (amooney4@twu.edu)

T/Th 11:00-12:20

Continuation of SPAN 2033 with progressively more advanced work. Grammar, composition, oral-aural practice, and readings. Development of skills in interpersonal communication, presentational speaking and writing, interpretive listening, and interpretive writing.

SPAN 3153.50: Spanish Grammar, Composition, and Literature I

Dr. Rubén Rodríguez-Jiménez (rrodriguezjimenez@twu.edu)

Online Synchronous: T/Th 7:30-8:50

The development of writing and reading skills and vocabulary in Spanish.

SPAN 3173.01: Spanish for Professions

Dr. William Benner (wbenner@twu.edu)

M/W 11:00-12:20

Instruction and practice in understanding and speaking Spanish encountered in various professions, business, community health, criminal justice, social work, sociology, OT, PT, oral healthcare workplace and mass communications.

SPAN 3173.50: Spanish for Professions

Dr. William Benner (wbenner@twu.edu)

Online Synchronous: T/Th 1:00-2:20

Page last updated 3:29 PM, July 6, 2020