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Policy Name: Faculty Workload Policy
Policy No: 5.07
Date Passed: February 17, 2012
Last Reviewed: February 2012
Review Next: March 2014

 Faculty Workload Policy

Purpose:

The purpose of the Texas Woman’s University (TWU) Faculty Workload Policy is twofold:  (a) to ensure the fair and equitable determination of workload for faculty throughout the University; and (b) to establish the guidelines for calculating the statutory workload of faculty in order to comply with Sections 51.401 and 51.403 of the Texas Education Code.

Review:

This policy will be reviewed biannually in the Spring semester of odd-numbered years by the Office of the Provost, in collaboration and full communication with the TWU Faculty Senate.

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Introduction:

Four key philosophical tenets guide the focus of this policy:  (a) the complex nature of any faculty member’s role; (b) the importance of allowing flexibility in determining workloads; (c) the need for procedures that ensure equitability; and (d) teaching as a priority and key component of a faculty member’s total workload.

Full-time service as a University faculty member requires participation in various duties and responsibilities, including:

  1. Teaching (including preparation, evaluation, student advisement, and the continuous incorporation of research/scholarly/creative work into the teaching process);
  2. professional, scholarly, research, or creative activities;
  3. administrative duties; and
  4. University, disciplinary, and/or community service.

While each faculty member may not be actively involved in all of these areas, the collective participation of the faculty in all areas is necessary to assure that goals essential to all aspects of the University mission are achieved.

The unique requirements of each academic component, as well as the specialized interests, abilities, and qualifications of individual faculty members, necessitate a flexible system for determining individual faculty assignments that will accommodate this diversity.  Decisions regarding assigning faculty teaching and non-teaching work units should be reached through a process of considering the needs of the academic unit and the individual faculty member, as well as the goals, expectations, and priorities of the College and the University.  These decisions rest with the component administrator (e.g., director, department chair, or associate dean) with oversight provided by the Dean.

In order to accomplish the administrative task of matching faculty with work to be done, this workload policy focuses on teaching and scholarly/research/creative activity.  This does not discount the importance of meaningful service, and determinations of workload credit for service rest with the component administrator, with oversight from the Dean and/or Provost as appropriate.

Faculty Workload for Fall and Spring Semesters

  1. Faculty workloads should accurately reflect the faculty’s teaching and those non-teaching work-related activities covered in this policy on a semester-by-semester basis. However, faculty workloads may reflect some, but not all, of the activities required for promotion and tenure for full-time, tenure-track faculty.
  2. To meet the needs of the University and to allow all faculty members as much flexibility as possible, each full-time, tenured and non-tenured, faculty member is required to carry a minimum of nine (9) work units during each fall and spring semester. A full-time faculty member’s workload generally should not exceed eighteen (18) work units for each of the fall and spring semesters. If this were to occur, the Dean and the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs must be notified in order to plan for future budget and staffing priorities.
  3. Each academic department is expected to maintain an average of twelve (12) work units for each of the fall and spring semesters for all full-time faculty members.
  4. In courses taught by more than one faculty member, work units shall be distributed in proportion to the amounts of time expended by each instructor.

 Faculty Workload for Summer Sessions

  1. Some university programs require 12-month continuous student enrollment. For these programs paid summer session reassigned time for program directors/coordinators with other ongoing administrative duties may be provided.
  2. A full-time workload for Summer sessions (Summer I, II, III, and/or full Summer) is a minimum of twelve (12) work units.  All summer teaching agreements are contingent on enrollment and needs of the component.  Faculty members are paid in the summer based on the percentage of the workload units produced up to 12 hours.  Across all summer sessions, the maximum work units assigned to an individual faculty member per student applies:
    1. 1 work unit for chairing a dissertation
    2. 0.5 work units for chairing a thesis or professional paper
    3. 1 work unit for supervised laboratory research

Teaching Work Unit Equivalencies Based on THECB Codes:

  1. *Code 1:  Organized Lecture Classes:  One semester credit hour (SCH) of course value = one work unit for organized classes numbered 1000 through 5000; and 1.5 for 6000 level courses.
  2. *Code 2:  Organized Laboratory, Physical Activity, Clinical Instruction (direct supervision of a group of students):  Contact hours for faculty exceed student credit hour value of course:  Lecture Hours (as figured in Code 1) + (Lab Contact Hours x 2/3) = work units.
  3. Code 3:  Indirect Supervision of Student Teachers, Interns, Practica and Cooperative Education:  Student also has an on-site direct supervisor or preceptor.  Total semester credit hours (SCH) generated divided by 6 = work units.
  4. *Code 4:  Seminar Classes:  Discussion class requiring extensive student contributions.  One semester credit hour (SCH) of course value = one work unit for organized classes numbered 1000 through 5000; and 1.5 for 6000 level courses.
  5. Code 5a: Individual/Independent study:  Total semester credit hours (SCH) generated divided by ten (10) = work units for undergraduate courses; total semester credit hours (SCH) generated divided by six (6) = work units for graduate courses.
  6. Code 5b: Supervised Laboratory Research: Total semester credit hours (SCH) generated divided by 3 = work units.
  7. Code 6:  Private Lesson/Instruction:  Weekly private music or other private instruction.  Total semester credit hours (SCH) generated divided by 3 = work units.
  8. Code 7: Not currently included in THECB coding
  9. Code 8:  Thesis or Professional Paper/Project Direction:  Total semester credit hours (SCH) generated divided by 6 = work units assigned to faculty of record.
  10. Code 9:  Dissertation Direction:  Total semester credit hours (SCH) generated divided by 3 = work units assigned to faculty of record.

*As organized classes, these require minimum student enrollment.

Additional Teaching Workload Credits Based on Class Size and Instructional Delivery Method

  1. In principle, assignment of workload units for a teaching assignment should accurately indicate the amount of effort required in instruction, which is not always a simple function of credit hours and class size.  Thus, other factors are often relevant to consideration of faculty workload units for assigned teaching.  Such factors include, but are not limited to:  class size, availability of course assistance, intensity of writing assignments, new course preparations, format of course (i.e., distance education, hybrid, face-to-face), travel required, etc.  A component administrator and Dean should always have the flexibility to consider these factors; however, considerations of class/section capacity should always occur jointly between faculty and component administrators.
  2. Although it is impossible to anticipate every permutation of instruction that might influence workload, the following guidelines apply for large class sections:
    1. Large Code 1 Undergraduate Classes: Teaching load credit for a large class that requires extensive grading and evaluation of student work is equal to the number of semester credit hours of the course weighted as follows: 1.2 for 60-69 students, 1.3 for 70-79 students, 1.4 for 80-89 students, 1.5 for 90-99 students, 1.6 for 100-124 students, 1.7 for 125-149 students, 1.8 for 150-174 students, 1.9 for 175-199 students, and 2.0 for 200-249 students. Component administrators will review classes with more than 250 students enrolled for possible additional teaching load credit.

      Additional support such as assigning graduate assistants to large size classes to assist the instructor of record may or may not influence assigned workload units for a large class dependent on such factors as the scope of the assistance provided, the pedagogy employed, nature of assignments, etc., all of which are a consideration of total work effort needed.

    2. Large Code 1 Graduate Classes: At the graduate level, class sizes will rarely be as large as undergraduate classes since they are bound by other factors such as size limitations placed by external accreditation standards or the type of instruction (e.g., skill-based). If an organized graduate class has excess enrollment (this number may vary between and within disciplines based on course content and type of instruction), the faculty member may be granted additional work units and/or additional instructional support (e.g., added graduate assistants) subject to approval of the component administrator and dean of the academic component.
    3. Distance Learning Class Sizes: Fully-online and hybrid courses require different use of faculty time.  Whenever the enrollment in a distance education or hybrid course substantially exceeds the number of students who can be effectively taught in the distance education context (this number may vary between and within disciplines based on course content), the academic unit may either assign additional faculty or instructional support (e.g., added graduate assistants) subject to approval of the component administrator and dean of the academic component. The component administrator in consultation with the faculty, and after reviewing best practices for online courses in the respective discipline, will determine the appropriate class sizes for distance learning and hybrid classes.
    4. Option for Divisional Review of Assigned Workload Units for Teaching:  In instances of ongoing or anticipated disagreement regarding the assignment of workload credit, a faculty member may request Provost-level review of assigned credits after efforts to resolve the issue at the Departmental/School and College levels have been exhausted.
    5. Non-Teaching Workload Equivalencies: Faculty may be granted workload credit in lieu of teaching for the following activities and/or duties subject to approval of the component administrator and dean of the academic component.
      1. Stipend-Based Administrative Duties:
        The TWU Criteria for Determining the Level of Administrator Stipends (adopted June, 2006) identifies four levels of Administrative Levels, ranging from Level I Administrators titled as Program Directors to Level IV Administrators of large departments or colleges and titled as Department Chair, School Director, or Associate Dean.  Work unit credit for the administrative duties of a stipend-based administrator shall range from three (3) to twelve (12) units depending on the size, scope, and productivity of the component and the scope of responsibilities of the administrator (these criteria are operationalized in the TWU Criteria for Determining the Level of Administrator Stipends policy document). The following chart is intended as a guide for determining work unit credit for administrative duties. The number of work units allocated to a particular administrator must be determined by the component administrator, Associate Dean, or Dean annually.

         

        Level I Administrator

        Level II Administrator

        Level III Administrator

        Level IV Administrator

        Example Titles:

        Program Director

        Department Chair, Associate Director, and Associate Dean

        Department Chair, Associate Director, and Associate Dean

        Department Chair, Director, and Associate Dean

        Administrative Work Units:

        3-6 work units

        6-9 work units

        6-9 work units

        9-12 work units

      2. Non-Stipend Based Administrative Duties:
        Work units may be granted a full-time faculty member for one or a combination of non-stipend based administrative duties within an academic component.  The following list is illustrative, but is not intended to constitute a complete list of possibilities.  The number of workload units assigned is variable based on the assigned duties.
        1. Program director, coordinator, or assistant administrator within a component or college;
        2. Developer of a major curricular initiative;
        3. Director of a performing arts production or exposition;
        4. Major academic advising responsibilities or course management;
        5. Chairing a major accreditation evaluation committee;
        6. Grant coordinator or project director for funded work;
        7. Administration of a University center or clinic involved in student training and/or community service.
      3. Research and Service-Related Activities:
        Work units may be awarded a full-time faculty member for research and service related activities. The following list is illustrative, but is not intended to constitute a complete list of possibilities. The number of workload units assigned is variable based on the assigned duties.
        1. Research, scholarly writing, creative activity, scholarship of teaching, or faculty development, any of which are not supported by extramural funds, may be approved;
        2. Research, scholarly writing, creative activity, scholarship in support of teaching, or faculty development which are supported by extramural funds as long as funds are available;
        3. Professional/scholarly/creative activity of regional, national, or international importance to the discipline and to the University;
        4. Community or University service of unusual importance and requiring a large amount of time;
        5. Scheduled, systematic participation in a University clinic or center involved in student training and/or community service provided such an activity involves supervision of students in credit-bearing practica or internships;
        6. Holding elected national office in a professional organization of importance to the discipline with major and time-intensive public and administrative responsibilities.
      4. Other Work Unit Allocations:
        1. A reduced teaching load may be granted or alternative work responsibilities assigned if scheduled instruction does not materialize.  This provision does not apply to summer sessions.
        2. Newly hired, tenure-track faculty may be granted up to a total of six (6) reassigned time work units during the first three academic years (excluding summer) in order to get their teaching, research, and service established.

      Responsibility for Administering Workload Standards


      The Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs is responsible for preparing required reports for submission to the Chancellor and President, the Board of Regents, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), the Legislative Budget Board, and the Governor’s Budget Office.

      The Provost/VPAA is responsible for enforcement of this policy, with adherence to the policy a requirement of all administrators in Academic Affairs.

page last updated 4/15/2014 2:37 PM