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Assistant Professor, Core School Psychology Faculty
Practicum and Internship Coordinator

CFO #813 Office
940-898-2329  phone | 940-898-2301 fax | email: wjohnson4@twu.edu

Ph.D.

2008

School Psychology – Texas Woman's University

M.A.

2005

School Psychology - Western Carolina University

B.A.    

2000   

Psychology - Bryan College

Licensure and Certification
Licensed Psychologist, Licensed Specialist in School Psychology, Nationally Certified School Psychologist

Courses Taught
Graduate: Intro to School Psychology, Neurodevelopmental and Genetic Disorders, Supervised Practicum, Advanced Developmental Psychology, Direct Behavior Interventions, and Internship.
Undergraduate:  Developmental Psychology, Adolescent Psychology, Tests and Measurements 

Research Interests

Video self-modeling interventions targeting social, behavioral, and functional deficits for children and adolescents with autism, intellectual deficits, emotional disturbance, ADHD, and traumatic brain injury.

Recent Publications and Presentations

  • Johnson, W. L., and Ruggles, M. (2016). Bridging the Gap in Early Childhood Special Education Services: Collaboration between School Districts and University Research. Young Children, 71(1), 38-43.
  • Maricle, D., and Johnson, W. L., (2016). Instructional Implications from the Woodcock-Johnson IV Tests of Cognitive Abilities. In D. Flanagan & V. Alfonso (Eds.). Clinical applications of the WJIV. Novato, CA: Academic Therapy Press. 
  • Miller, D. C., McGill, R., & Bauman Johnson, W. L. (2016). Neurocognitive Applications of the WJ-IV. In D. Flanagan & V. Alfonso (Eds.). Clinical applications of the WJIV. Novato, CA: Academic Therapy Press.
  • Schaeffer, K., Hamilton, K., and Johnson, W. L. (2016). Video self-modeling interventions for students with autism spectrum disorder. Intervention in School and Clinic, 52(1), 1-8.
  • LaSpata, M., Carter, C., Johnson, W. L., and McGill, R. (2015). Evaluating Video Self-Modeling Treatment Outcomes: Differentiating Between Statistically and Clinically Significant Change. Contemporary School Psychology, 20 (2), 170-182. doi:10.1007/s40688-015-0072-8
  • Appleby, W., Johnson, W. L., Bowens, L., Franco, K., and Reece, B. (2015). Utilizing video self-modeling for adolescents with intellectual disabilities in the educational setting. Research and Practice in the Schools, 3(1), 1-10.
  • Scott, S., Rosen, L. H., DeOrnellas, K., & Johnson, W. (May, 2015). Spanking or grounding: Ethnic differences in the endorsement of parental and school  disciplinary acts. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Psychological Science, New York, NY.
  • La Spata, M., Foster, R. G., & Johnson, W. L. (2015, October). The efficacy of video self-modeling in addressing aggressive behavior among children identified as at-risk. Poster presented at Texas Association of School Psychology Conference 2015, San Antonio, Texas.
  • Lerma, B. Sullivan, D., & Johnson, W. L. (2015, October). The neuropsychology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with select interventions to target association deficits: A literature review. Poster presented at Texas Association of School Psychology Conference 2015, San Antonio, Texas.
  • Schaeffer, K. M., Caldwell, K. E., & Johnson, W. L. (February, 2016). Using VSM to Help Teachers Increase Compliance in the Classroom. Presentation given at the National Association of School Psychologists conference in New Orleans, LA.  
  • LaSpata, M. G., Mulkey, B. C., & Johnson., W. L. (February, 2016). Evaluating the Efficacy of Video Self-Modeling. Presentation given at the National Association of School Psychologists conference in New Orleans, LA.
  • McGill, R. J., Johnson, W. L., & Caldwell, K. E. (February, 2016). Praxis Series School Psychology Examination Outcomes: Examining Effects across Salient Training Program Characteristics. Poster presentation given at the Trainers of School Psychology conference at NASP, New Orleans, LA
  • Garcia, A., Hagler, H., & Johnson, W. "Using video self-modeling to target food selectivity behaviors in autism: A pilot study."  Poster session at the Texas Woman’s University Student Creative Arts and Research Symposium, Denton, TX, April 12-13, 2016.
  • Bowles, K., Buchanan, K., and Johnson, W. L. (2015, Summer). Enhancing social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder using video self-modeling. School Psychology: From Science to Practice to Policy, 8(1), 20-27.
  • Johnson, W. L., Caldwell, K., Carter, C. W., and LaSpata, M. G. (February, 2015). Video Self-Modeling Interventions: The Successes and Challenges of Implementation. Mini-skills presentation given at the National Association of School Psychologists conference, Orlando, F. L.
  • Schaeffer, K., Appleby, W., Greer, R., and Johnson, W. L. (February, 2015). Utilizing Video Self-Modeling for Students with Emotional Disturbance. Mini-skills presentation given at the National Association of School Psychologists conference, Orlando, F. L.
  • Johnson, W. L., Carter, C. W., and LaSpata, M. G. (November, 2014). Utilizing Video Self-Modeling as a School-Age Cognitive Rehabilitation Intervention of Executive Functions. Poster presentation given at the Texas Psychological Association Conference, Dallas, T.X.
  • Johnson, WL., Bowles, K., Caldwell, K., and Carter, C. (November, 2014). Video Self-Modeling Interventions: Implications of age, maintenance, and intervention type. Mini-skills presentation given at the Texas State Autism Conference, Corpus Christi, T.X.
  • Schaeffer, K., Appleby, W., Greer, R., and Johnson, W. L., (October, 2014). Video Self-Modeling: An effective intervention across disability areas and age groups. Mini-skills presentation given at the Texas Association of School Psychologists Conference, Las Colinas, T.X.

 

 

 

page last updated 11/28/2016 12:46 PM